Offered to students admitted to Year 1 in ALL
Major/Minor ALL
Course Type
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y N
Date2019/05/26 03:18
Enquiry for Course Details
BIOC1600 Perspectives in biochemistry (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biomedical Sciences Quota ---
Course Co-ordinator Dr J Tanner, Biomedical Sciences < jatanner@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr B C W Wong,Biomedical Sciences)
(Dr C Ho,Biomedical Sciences)
(Dr J Tanner,Biomedical Sciences)
(Dr L Y L Cheng,Biomedical Sciences)
(Dr. M S Y Huen,Biomedical Sciences)
(Dr. R C C Chang,Biomedical Sciences)
Course Objectives - Teach students a biochemical perspective on each of the Basic Sciences focusing on concepts fundamental to the learning of Biochemistry.
- Promote deep learning of course material through an integrated programme of practical and collaborative tasks.
- Inspire students with a view of the great discoveries and future challenges for Biochemistry.
- Help students make the transition from school to university by developing their teamwork, independent study skills and confidence to communicate within a Biochemistry learning environment.
Course Contents & Topics A Biochemical Perspective on the Basic Sciences

A. Chemistry for Biochemistry
The elements and bonding (from carbon to Coenzyme A); Resonance and orbital theory (a focus on the electron); Structure and conformation (thinking in 3 dimensions); Isomerism (from mirrors to thalidomide); Water (the universal biochemical solvent) & buffer; Quantitation in chemistry (who was Avogadro anyway?).

B. Biology for Biochemistry
The basic building blocks of life (proteins, DNA, lipids, carbohydrate); The Central Dogma of Molecular Biology; Evolution (considering molecular evolution); Origins of life (the chicken-egg paradox of proteins and DNA)

C. Physics and Mathematics for Biochemistry
Thermodynamics from a Biological Perspective; Introduction to molecular recognition and binding (DNA melting); Statistics for biochemistry (applied statistics for what you really need to know); Thinking numbers (exponentials, logs and the limits of life).

D. Inspiring Biochemistry
The protein; The gene; Vitamins and disease;  Synthetic biology; The challenges of modern-day genetics Drugs-successes and failures.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 describe the basics of biomolecular structure from a chemical perspective, thereby integrating the basic sciences of biology, chemistry and physics into a biochemical perspective
CLO 2 apply knowledge of biomolecular structure to review major discoveries and contemporary issues in molecular biology
CLO 3 interpret scientific data and discuss major issues in biochemistry using the scientific literature
CLO 4 demonstrate skills in working and collaborating together with colleagues in practicals and in presentation of scientific ideas
CLO 5 relate how biochemistry intersects with the three basic sciences of biology, chemistry and physics, and recognize the transition from school to university level study
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Level 3 or above in HKDSE Biology, Chemistry, or Combined Science with Biology or Chemistry component, or equivalent
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2017 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2016 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2015 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2014 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        1st sem    Examination Dec     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Exceptionally good performance demonstrating comprehensive understanding of the subject matter; critical insight into use of scientific data and the scientific literature; superior presentation and group collaboration skills.
B Good performance demonstrating full understanding of the subject matter; coherent insight into use of scientific data and the scientific literature; good presentation and group collaboration skills.
C Satisfactory performance demonstrating adequate understanding of the subject matter; some insight into use of scientific data and the scientific literature; some presentation and group collaboration skills.
D Limited performance demonstrating some understanding of basic subject matter; some ability to use scientific data and the scientific literature; limited presentation and group collaboration skills.
Fail Poor understanding of subject matter; with little to no insight into use of scientific data; no understanding of the scientific literature and unable to present or collaborate.
Course Type Lecture-based course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Group work Practical classess 12
Lectures or workshops 36
Assessment Tasks and preparation 30
Reading / Self study 50
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments including practical writeups 20 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Examination 50 CLO 1,2,3
Project reports group communication project 30 CLO 2,3,4,5
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
TBC
Course Website NIL
Additional Course Information Also offered as ENGG1207 "Foundations of biochemistry for medical engineering" to students of the Faculty of Engineering. Students who have passed ENGG1207 is considered to have passed BIOC1600.


BIOC2600 Basic biochemistry (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biomedical Sciences Quota 300
Course Co-ordinator Prof D K Y Shum, Biomedical Sciences < shumdkhk@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr A S L Wong,Biomedical Sciences)
(Dr C M Qian,Biomedical Sciences)
(Dr C W Lee,Biomedical Sciences)
(Prof D K Y Shum,Biomedical Sciences)
Course Objectives This course is designed to present an overview of biochemistry of fundamental importance to the life process. We aim to develop appreciation of the basics in biochemistry as a common ground for science and non-science students to progress into their areas of specialization. Students intending to pursue further studies in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology will find this course particularly helpful.
Course Contents & Topics Structure and functions of carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, amino acids and proteins; enzymes and co-enzymes; basic bioenergetics; key metabolic processes in a living cell; signaling across cell membranes; flow of genetic information
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 relate structures to functions of biomolecules
CLO 2 explain the functions of key metabolic processes
CLO 3 explain the significance of signaling across cell membranes
CLO 4 explain the flow of genetic information
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOC1600 or BIOL1110 or ENGG1207; and
Not for students who have passed in BIOL2220 or MEDE2301, or have already enrolled in these courses.
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology (Intensive) ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2018 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1 >
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2 >
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology (Intensive) < PLO 1,2 >
2017 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2017 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1 >
2017 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2 >
2016 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2016 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1 >
2016 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2 >
2015 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2015 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1 >
2015 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2 >
2014 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1 >
2014 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        1st sem    Examination Dec     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrates thorough and complete mastery of the entire range of knowledge and analytical skills as required for maximal attainment in all the course learning outcomes; excellence in critical thinking towards application of the knowledge in a range of contexts.
B Demonstrates substantial command of a broad range of knowledge and analytical skills as required for attainment of the majority of course learning outcomes; good evidence of critical thinking towards application of the knowledge in a range of contexts.
C Demonstrates general but incomplete command of knowledge and analytical skills as required for attainment of adequate course learning outcomes; some evidence critical thinking towards application of the knowledge in a range of contexts.
D Demonstrates partial but limited command of knowledge and analytical skills as required for attainment of some of the course learning outcomes; limited evidence of critical thinking towards application of the knowledge in a range of contexts.
Fail Demonstrates little or no evidence of command of knowledge and analytical skills as required for attainment of the course learning outcomes; lacking in critical thinking towards application of the knowledge in a range of contexts.
Course Type Lecture-based course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Lectures 36
Tutorials 12
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments 20 CLO 1,2,3,4
Examination 60 CLO 1,2,3,4
Test 20 CLO 1,2,3,4
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Nelson DL, Cox MM (2008) Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry, 5th ed. W.H. Freeman, New York.
Any other Biochemistry textbooks, e.g. Berg JM, Tymoczko JL, Stryer L (2012) Biochemistry, 7th ed. W.H. Freeman, New York.
Course Website NIL
Additional Course Information Also offered as MEDE2301 "Life Sciences I (Biochemistry)" to students of the Faculty of Engineering. Students who have passed MEDE2301 is considered to have passed BIOC2600.


BIOC3601 Basic metabolism (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biomedical Sciences Quota 80
Course Co-ordinator Dr N S Wong, Biomedical Sciences < nswong@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr L Y L Cheng,Biomedical Sciences)
(Dr N S Wong,Biomedical Sciences)
(Dr. L W Lim,Biomedical Sciences)
(Dr. S Sanyal,Biomedical Sciences)
Course Objectives This course aims to provide foundation concepts of metabolism. It will enable students of this course to see how some of the basic concepts in biochemistry (specifically those learned in BIOC1600 and BIOC2600) could be applied to explain one of the most important and cardinal issues of biological life: the acquisition of metabolic energy. The course will lay the foundation for the more advanced courses offered in the Biochemistry Major and will also serve as a useful complement to courses on nutrition and dietetics.
Course Contents & Topics This course focuses on the central metabolic pathways involved in the provision of energy needed by living organisms. Major metabolic pathways covered in this course include those that are involved in the synthesis and breakdown of glucose, glycogen, triacylglycerol, and amino acids.  The metabolism of purines and pyrimidines will also be considered. Emphasis is on the understanding of the metabolic reactions involved and how they are regulated in relation to environmental cues. Metabolic derangements as a basis of diseases will also be discussed.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 explain the significance of individual steps in a metabolic pathway
CLO 2 recognize the importance and the need for regulation of metabolic pathways
CLO 3 discuss the roles of enzymes in the regulation of metabolic pathways
CLO 4 describe how metabolic process are integrated under different physiological and pathological conditions
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOC2600 or BIOL2220 or MEDE2301
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2017 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2016 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2015 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2014 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        1st sem    Examination Dec     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrates thorough and extensive knowledge and skills required for attaining all the course learning outcomes. Displays a strong analytical ability and logical thinking and is able to apply knowledge to a wide range of complex situations. Consistently able to communicate sophisticated ideas confidently and clearly.
B Demonstrates substantial knowledge and skills required for attaining most of the course learning outcomes. Shows evidence of analytical ability and logical thinking and is sometimes able to apply knowledge to complex situations. Often communicates complex ideas clearly.
C Demonstrates general but incomplete knowledge and skills required for attaining most of the course learning outcomes. Shows evidence of some analytical ability and logical thinking and is sometimes able to apply knowledge to familiar or uncomplicated situations. Sometimes communicates ideas clearly.
D Demonstrates limited knowledge and skills required for attaining some of the course learning outcomes. Shows poor analytical ability and logical thinking and is rarely able to apply knowledge to solve problems. Has difficulty in expressing ideas coherently.
Fail Demonstrates little or no evidence of knowledge and skills required for attaining the course learning outcomes. Lacks analytical ability and logical thinking and is unable to apply knowledge to solve problems. Ineffective at communicating ideas.
Course Type Lecture-based course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Lectures glycolysis; gluconeogenesis; pentose phosphate pathway; glycogen metabolis; lipid metabolis; purine and pyrimidine metabolism; regulation and integration of metabolic pathways 36
Tutorials working on problems relating to the lecture topics 12
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments 30 CLO 1,2,3,4
Examination 3 hrs examination 70 CLO 1,2,3,4
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Berg JM, Tymoczko JL, Stryer L (2007) Biochemistry, 6th ed. W.H. Freeman, New York.
Devlin TM (2006) Textbook of Biochemistry: with Clinical Correlations, 6th ed. Wiley-Liss, Hoboken, New Jersey.
Nelson DL, Cox MM (2008) Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry, 5th ed. W.H. Freeman, New York.
Course Website NIL
Additional Course Information NIL


BIOC3604 Essential techniques in biochemistry and molecular biology (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biomedical Sciences Quota 70
Course Co-ordinator Dr K M Yao, Biomedical Sciences < kmyao@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr B C W Wong,Biomedical Sciences)
(Dr K M Yao,Biomedical Sciences)
(Dr N S Wong,Biomedical Sciences)
(Dr. R C C Chang,Biomedical Sciences)
(Prof D K Y Shum,Biomedical Sciences)
(Prof. Z J Zhou,Biomedical Sciences)
Course Objectives To give students a general overview of different experimental approaches and model systems, and to provide students with hands-on experience in basic biochemical and molecular techniques.
Course Contents & Topics Basic concepts in experimental science; writing of lab notebooks; experimental approaches - genetic, biochemical, molecular, genomic and others; methods for isolation and analysis of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and nucleic acids; subcellular fractionation; enzyme assays and spectrophotometry; basic nucleic acid manipulation - PCR, site-directed mutagenesis, blotting and hybridization, cloning strategies, restriction mapping.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 explain the basic principles of various biochemical and molecular techniques
CLO 2 describe different experimental approaches for achieving defined experimental aims
CLO 3 apply different techniques to biochemical and molecular analyses
CLO 4 appreciate the importance of maintaining a scientific laboratory notebook satisfactorily
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOC2600 or BIOL2220 or MEDE2301
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2017 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2016 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2015 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2014 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        2nd sem    Examination May     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrates thorough and extensive knowledge and skills required for attaining all the course learning outcomes. Shows strong analytical ability and logical thinking, with evidence of original thought. Competently conducts laboratory skills and techniques with confidence and can critically appraise data to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions.
B Demonstrates substantial knowledge and skills required for attaining most of the course learning outcomes. Shows evidence of critical thinking and analytical skills. Conducts laboratory skills and techniques with confidence and can appraise data to draw appropriate conclusions.
C Demonstrates general but incomplete knowledge and skills required for attaining most of the course learning outcomes. Shows some evidence of critical thinking and analytical skills. Conducts laboratory skills and techniques to a satisfactory level of competence and can sometimes correctly appraise data and draw appropriate conclusions.
D Demonstrates partial but limited knowledge and skills required for attaining some of the course learning outcomes. Shows limited critical thinking and analytical skills. Displays poor laboratory skills and techniques and is rarely able to use data to draw appropriate conclusions.
Fail Demonstrates little or no evidence of knowledge and skills required for attaining the course learning outcomes. Lacks analytical ability and logical thinking. Displays ineffective lab skills and techniques and is unable to use data to draw appropriate conclusions.
Course Type Lecture with laboratory component course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Laboratory 72
Lectures 12
Tutorials 6
Reading / Self study 76
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments 50 CLO 1,2,3,4
Examination 50 CLO 1,2,3
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Cox MM, Doudna JA and O'Donnell M (2015) Molecular Biology: Principles and Practice, 2nd ed. Macmillan.
Scopes RK (1994) Protein Purification: Principles and Practice. 3rd ed, Springer Advanced Texts in Chemistry, Springer-Verlag, New York.
Wilson K, Walker KM (2005) Principles and Techniques of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. 6th ed. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
Course Website NIL
Additional Course Information NIL


BIOC3605 Sequence bioinformatics (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biomedical Sciences Quota 50
Course Co-ordinator Dr B C W Wong, Biomedical Sciences < bcwwong@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr B C W Wong,Biomedical Sciences)
(Dr. T T Y Lam,Publich Health)
Course Objectives This course will examine existing bioinformatics tools for DNA and protein sequence analysis. The underlying principles of these analysis programs and services will be presented. Students will learn how to retrieve, analyze, and compare protein and DNA sequences using bioinformatics tools available on the World Wide Web.
Course Contents & Topics This course will introduce and discuss the following topics:

DNA and protein sequence database, protein family databases; information searching and retrieval - Entrez and SRS; Simple sequence analysis; sequence alignment: pair-wise alignment, multiple sequence alignment, substitution matrices; sequence database searching: algorithm and parameters; sequence patterns and motifs, and profiles; phylogenetic analysis; gene prediction.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 search and retrieve sequence information from biological databases
CLO 2 describe the algorithms for pairwise and multiple alignments, BLAST search, and phylogenetic trees construction
CLO 3 perform sequence analysis using EMBOSS package and other web-based analysis tools
CLO 4 interpret results from sequence alignments and BLAST database searches
CLO 5 use results from various sequence analysis tools to annotate a biological sequence
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOC2600 or BIOL2220 or BBMS2003 or BBMS2007 or MEDE2301
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2017 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2016 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2015 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2014 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        2nd sem    Examination May     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrates thorough and complete mastery at an advanced level of extensive knowledge and skills required for attaining all the course learning outcomes; strong critical thinking; excellent ability to apply bioinformatics skills in a range of context.
B Demonstrates substantial command of a broad range of knowledge and skills required for attaining at least most of the course learning outcomes; evidence of critical thinking; good ability to apply bioinformatics skills in a range of context.
C Demonstrates general but incomplete command of knowledge and skills required for attaining most of the course learning outcome; some critical thinking; adequate ability to apply bioinformatics skills in a range of context.
D Demonstrates partial but limited command of knowledge and skills required for attaining some of the course learning outcomes; limited critical thinking; limited ability to apply bioinformatics skills in a range of context.
Fail Demonstrates little or no evidence of command of knowledge and skills required for attaining the course learning outcomes; lack of critical thinking; little or no ability to apply bioinformatics skills in a range of context.
Course Type Lecture-based course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Lectures 36
Tutorials 12
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments 30 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Examination 70 CLO 2,4
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Baxevanis AD, Ouellette BFF (2005) Bioinformatics: A Practical Guide to the Analysis of Genes and Proteins, 3rd ed. Wiley, Hoboken, N.J.
Mount DW (2004) Bioinformatics: Sequence and Genome Analysis, 2nd ed. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, Cold Spring Harbor, New York.
Course Website NIL
Additional Course Information NIL


BIOC3606 Molecular medicine (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biomedical Sciences Quota 50
Course Co-ordinator Prof D Y Jin, Biomedical Sciences < dyjin@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr B Gao,Biomedical Sciences)
(Dr. S K Y Ma,Biomedical Sciences)
(Dr. YQ Song,Biomedical Sciences)
(Prof D Y Jin,Biomedical Sciences)
(Prof K S E Cheah,Biomedical Sciences)
(Prof M H Sham,Biomedical Sciences)
Course Objectives To provide up-to-date knowledge of the molecular and cellular basis of selected human diseases including cancer and infection with HIV and influenza viruses, thereby preparing the students for a career in biomedical, biotechnological, pharmaceutical and genomic research.
Course Contents & Topics This course covers cell signaling in relation to human diseases, molecular basis of cancer and viral diseases, and molecular therapeutics. Specific topics may include cell signaling, mouse model of human diseases, oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes, genome instability, HIV science, genetics and pathogenesis of influenza viruses, molecular approaches to vaccine development, immune checkpoint therapy, stem cells and stem cell therapy, gene therapy, and nucleic acid therapeutics. Basic knowledge of biochemistry and molecular cell biology is assumed for students taking this course.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 explain the molecular mechanisms underlying selected human diseases including cancer
CLO 2 illustrate the application of molecular biology in medicine with examples
CLO 3 integrate and translate knowledge in molecular biology to new approaches in disease prevention and intervention
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOC2600 or BIOL2220 or MEDE2301
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2017 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2016 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2015 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2014 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        2nd sem    Examination May     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Displays a comprehensive grasp of the key concepts underlying the molecular basis of human diseases, with few omissions or errors. Able to articulate clearly with examples how knowledge in molecular biology can lead to new strategies in disease prevention and intervention. Evidence of strong analytical and critical thinking when dealing with complex scientific data. Some evidence for additional information beyond what is given in the lectures.
B Displays a substantial and near-complete grasp of the key concepts underlying the molecular basis of human diseases, but without depth in some areas and with some omissions and factual errors. An understanding of the topic though is clear. Able to relate knowledge in molecular biology to new strategies in disease prevention and intervention. Able to apply analytical and critical thinking skills when dealing with scientific data.
C Displays a general understanding of the key concepts underlying the molecular basis of human disease and is sometimes able to relate knowledge in molecular biology to new strategies in disease prevention and intervention. Sometimes able to apply analytical and critical thinking skills when dealing with scientific data.
D Displays a limited understanding of the key concepts underlying the molecular basis of human disease and is rarely able to relate knowledge in molecular biology to new strategies in disease prevention and intervention. Evidence of weak analytical and critical thinking skills when dealing with scientific data.
Fail Displays an incorrect or incomplete understanding of the key concepts underlying the molecular basis of human disease and is unable to relate this knowledge to effective treatment strategies. No evidence of analytical or critical thinking skills when dealing with scientific data.
Course Type Lecture-based course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Lectures 36
Tutorials 12
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Examination 80 CLO 1,2,3
Test 20 CLO 1,2,3
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Lodish et al: Molecular Cell Biology 7th ed., 2013 (4th ed. is available at NCBI Books)
Alberts et al: Molecular Biology of the Cell 6th ed., 2015 (4th ed. is available at NCBI Books)
Cassimeris et al: Lewin's Cells, 2nd ed., 2011
Course Website NIL
Additional Course Information NIL


BIOC3999 Directed studies in biochemistry (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biomedical Sciences Quota 36
Course Co-ordinator Prof J D Huang, Biomedical Sciences < jdhuang@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (All academic staff in Biochemistry Major,Biomedical Sciences)
(Prof J D Huang,Biomedical Sciences)
Course Objectives To enhance students knowledge of a particular topic and the students self-directed learning and critical thinking skills.
Course Contents & Topics The student undertakes a self-managed study on a topic in biochemistry under the supervision of a staff member.  The topic is preferably one not sufficiently covered in the regular curriculum.  The directed study can be a critical review or a synthesis of published work on the subject.  A laboratory or field study may also be involved that would enhance the student's understanding of the subject.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 critically appraise research literature in a specific area of biochemistry and molecular biology
CLO 2 examine the theoretical or experimental basis for existing concepts
CLO 3 identify questions and evaluate issues for further research development
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in at least 24 credits of advanced level (level 3 or 4) disciplinary core/elective courses in Biochemistry Major including BIOC2600 and BIOL3401.
This capstone course is for Biochemistry Major students only.
The earliest that a student is allowed to take this capstone course is their year 3 study.
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2017 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2016 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2015 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2014 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        1st sem    2nd sem    Summer    Examination No Exam     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Produces a sophisticated and detailed appraisal of the biochemical literature, displaying a comprehensive and deep understanding of the selected topic. Able to contextualize all the ideas within a personal framework of knowledge and evaluate relevant issues emerging from the study. Works proactively with a supervisor to enhance understanding and scientific writing skills. Communicates the findings to a broader audience in an effective way and responds knowledgeably to questions. Excellent time-management skills and able to reflect honestly on one¡¦s own learning.
B Produces a coherent appraisal of the biochemical literature, displaying a sound understanding of the selected topic. Able to contextualize many of the ideas within a personal framework of knowledge and identify some relevant issues emerging from the study. Works constructively with a supervisor to enhance understanding and scientific writing skills. Clearly communicates the findings to a broader audience and responds knowledgeably to most questions. Able to time-manage effectively and reflect on one¡¦s own learning.
C Produces a reasonable appraisal of the biochemical literature, displaying an adequate understanding of the selected topic. Able to contextualize a few of the ideas within a personal framework of knowledge and makes some attempt to identify some relevant issues emerging from the study. Works with a supervisor and other co-workers to improve understanding and scientific writing skills. Communicates the findings to a broader audience with reasonable clarity and responds to most questions. Acceptable time-management and self-reflection skills.
D Produces a superficial appraisal of the biochemical literature, displaying a limited understanding of the selected topic. Able to contextualize a few of the ideas within a personal framework of knowledge but unable to identify any relevant issues emerging from the study. Works reluctantly with a supervisor and other co-workers to develop understanding and scientific writing skills. Displays weak communication skills when presenting the findings to a broader audience. Poor time-management and self-reflection skills.
Fail Fails to appraise the biochemical literature and thus unable to display any understanding of the selected topic. Unable to contextualize the ideas within a personal framework of knowledge or identify any relevant issues emerging from the study. Works in isolation, thus failing to make progress in understanding and scientific writing skills. Unable to communicate effectively when presenting the findings to a broader audience. No time-management skills or ability to self-reflect.
Course Type Project-based course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Reading / Self study at least 120 hours on the project 120
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Dissertation including mind map (10%) 60 CLO 1,2,3
Oral presentation 25 CLO 1,2,3
Research report Supervisor comments 15 CLO 1,2,3
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
as suggested by project supervisors
Course Website NIL
Additional Course Information NIL


BIOC4610 Advanced biochemistry (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biomedical Sciences Quota 50
Course Co-ordinator Dr K M Yao, Biomedical Sciences < kmyao@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr K M Yao,Biomedical Sciences)
(Prof D Chan,Biomedical Sciences)
(Prof D K Y Shum,Biomedical Sciences)
(Prof J D Huang,Biomedical Sciences)
Course Objectives This course aims at providing students an in-depth understanding of molecular and cellular signaling in multicellular organisms. This course is particularly useful for students interested in research or intending to develop a career in biomedical sciences.
Course Contents & Topics A. Inter and intracellular signal transduction mechanisms
Cell-surface receptors and signal transduction proteins; G-Protein-coupled receptors: structure and mechanism; signaling pathways that control gene expression: receptors that activate protein tyrosine kinases, the Ras/MAP kinase pathway, phosphoinositide signaling pathways and receptor serine kinases that activate Smads

B. Cytoskeleton as target of signal transduction
The microtubule cytoskeleton; kinesin and dynein motor; the actin cytoskeleton; myosin; the intermediate filament; cytoskeletion and cell behavior; cytoskeleton and intracellular transport in neuron

C. Protein trafficking and sorting pathways
Translocation of secretory proteins - insertion into the ER; major protein sorting pathways; protein modification, folding and quality control in the ER; molecular mechanism of vesicular traffic; protein sorting and processing

D. Cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion
Cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) junctions and their adhesion molecules; cadherins and integrins; collagens and proteoglycans; when cell meets the matrix; regulation of signaling molecules by ECM
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 describe the molecular and cellular signal transduction mechanisms that mediate cellular communication to achieve a plethora of cellular responses
CLO 2 illustrate the controls of the metabolic and cellular regulation based on their understanding of cytoskeleton as target of signal transduction, protein trafficking and sorting pathways, and cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion
CLO 3 develop critical thinking and analytical skills
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOC3601 or BIOL3401 or BIOL3402 or BIOL3404
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2017 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2016 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2015 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2014 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        1st sem    Examination Dec     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough and complete mastery at an advanced level of extensive knowledge and skills required for attaining all the course learning outcomes. Show strong critical thinking and analytical skills, with evidence of original thought, and ability to apply knowledge to a wide range of complex, familiar and unfamiliar situations.
B Demonstrate substantial command of a broad range of knowledge and skills required for attaining at least most of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of critical thinking and analytical skills, and ability to apply knowledge to familiar and some unfamiliar situations.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete command of knowledge and skills required for attaining most of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of some critical thinking and analytical skills, and ability to apply knowledge to most familiar situations.
D Demonstrate partial but limited command of knowledge and skills required for attaining some of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of some critical thinking, but with limited analytical skills. Show limited ability to apply knowledge to solve problems.
Fail Demonstrate little or no evidence of command of knowledge and skills required for attaining the course learning outcomes. Lack of critical thinking and analytical skills. Show very little or no ability to apply knowledge to solve problems.
Course Type Lecture-based course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Lectures 36
Tutorials 12
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments 30 CLO 1,2,3
Examination 70 CLO 1,2,3
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Lodish H et al (2016) Molecular Cell Biology, 8th ed. Freeman (New York) & Macmillan (England).
Alberts B et al (2014) Molecular Biology of the Cell, 6th ed. Garland Science, New York.
Course Website NIL
Additional Course Information NIL


   <<< This course is not offered in 2018 - 2019. Course details are subject to change. >>>
BIOC4611 Advanced biochemistry II (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biomedical Sciences Quota 50
Course Co-ordinator Prof D Chan, Biomedical Sciences < chand@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr C M Qian,Biomedical Sciences)
(Dr J Tanner,Biomedical Sciences)
(Dr M Kotaka,Physiology)
(Dr N S Wong,Biomedical Sciences)
(Prof D Chan,Biomedical Sciences)
Course Objectives This course is aim at providing students with an up-to-date knowledge of protein biochemistry from sequence to structure and disease; realizing the importance of kinetics in cellular function and an appreciation of the technological advances in the characterization of macromolecules.
Course Contents & Topics Topics including protein folding and misfolding in diseases; conformation of proteins and the role of conformational changes in protein function; catalytic mechanisms of enzymes and enzyme kinetics; biomolecular interactions; characterization of macromolecules using X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance and other spectroscopy methods; protein engineering and therapeutic approaches targeting protein function.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 describe how protein structures inform functions
CLO 2 recognize the roles of enzyme kinetics in cellular functions
CLO 3 derive structural information of macromolecules from experimental data
CLO 4 apply their knowledge on protein engineering and therapeutics, and on experimental designs in basic and applied research
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOC3601; and BIOL3404 or CHEM2441; and
Pass in BIOC4610, or already enrolled in this course
Course to PLO Mapping
Offer in 2018 - 2019 N        To be confirmed Examination To be confirmed
Offer in 2019 - 2020 N
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Clear and insightful description of how protein structure informs function; clear evidence of ability to recognize mechanisms of enzyme function and interpretation of data; effectual demonstration of applying knowledge to the design of scientific methodologies and cohesive, systematic and creative organization of information for presentation and communication.
B Clear description of how protein structure informs function; evidence of ability to recognize mechanisms of enzyme function and interpretation of data; capable demonstration of applying knowledge to the design of scientific methodologies; and cohesive and systematic organization of information for presentation and communication.
C Awareness of how protein structure informs function; some evidence of ability to recognize mechanisms of enzyme function and interpretation of data; some capable demonstration of applying knowledge to the design of scientific methodologies and systematic organization of information for presentation and communication.
D Superficial awareness of how protein structure informs function; limited evidence of ability to recognize mechanisms of enzyme function and interpretation of data; superficial demonstration of applying knowledge to the design of scientific methodologies and limited organizational skill of information for presentation and communication.
Fail Lack of awareness of how protein structure informs function; lack of ability to recognize mechanisms of enzyme function and interpretation of data; superficial demonstration of applying knowledge to the design of scientific methodologies; insufficient organizational skill of information for presentation and communication.
Course Type Lecture-based course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Lectures 36
Tutorials 12
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments 30 CLO 1,2,3,4
Examination 70 CLO 1,2,3,4
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Fersht A (1999) Structure and Mechanism in Protein Science: A Guide to Enzyme Catalysis and Protein Folding. W.H. Freeman, New York.
To be given.
Course Website NIL
Additional Course Information NIL


BIOC4612 Molecular biology of the gene (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biomedical Sciences Quota 50
Course Co-ordinator Prof K S E Cheah, Biomedical Sciences < hrmbdkc@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr K M Yao,Biomedical Sciences)
(Dr R K Ng,Biomedical Sciences)
(Prof K S E Cheah,Biomedical Sciences)
(Prof. ZJ Zhou,Biomedical Sciences)
Course Objectives To provide an up-to-date knowledge of molecular biology, especially with respect to the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression.
Course Contents & Topics This is a comprehensive course covering many detailed molecular aspects of gene regulation and gene function.  Through this course an understanding of how gene expression can be regulated at levels of transcription and post transcription will be gained.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 describe the mechanisms for regulation of transcription, RNA processing and translation in eukaryotes
CLO 2 explain how cellular homeostasis can be maintained by a combination of controls of gene expression at multiple levels
CLO 3 illustrate the hierarchy of gene expression regulation in stem cells and developmental processes
CLO 4 interpret experimental results in gene regulation studies
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOC3601 or BIOL3401 or BIOL3402 or BIOL3404 or BBMS2007
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2017 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2016 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2015 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2014 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        2nd sem    Examination May     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrates a deep and comprehensive understanding of the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression and its relevance to disease and effectively relates the knowledge to developmental processes. Uses skill and insight to analyse and interpret experimental data from gene regulation studies.
B Demonstrates a competent grasp of the key concepts in the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression and its relevance to disease and is able to link the knowledge to developmental processes. Correctly analyses and interprets experimental data from gene regulation studies.
C Demonstrates a basic understanding of the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression and its relevance to disease and is sometimes able to relate the knowledge to developmental processes. Displays a limited capacity to analyse and interpret experimental data from gene regulation studies.
D Demonstrates a simplistic knowledge of the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression and rarely relates the information to developmental processes. Displays weak analytical skills and is rarely able to interpret experimental data from gene regulation studies.
Fail Demonstrates incomplete or incorrect knowledge of the regulation of gene expression and is unable to relate the ideas to developmental processes. Unable to analyse or interpret experimental data from gene regulation studies.
Course Type Lecture-based course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Lectures 36
Tutorials 12
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments 20 CLO 1,2,3,4
Examination 80 CLO 1,2,3,4
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Alberts B et al. (2014) Molecular Biology of the Cell, 6th ed. Garland Science, New York.
Watson JD et al. (2014) Molecular Biology of the Gene, 7th ed. Pearson/Benjamin Cummings, San Francisco.
Course Website NIL
Additional Course Information NIL


BIOC4613 Advanced techniques in biochemistry & molecular biology (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biomedical Sciences Quota 70
Course Co-ordinator Prof D Chan, Biomedical Sciences < chand@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr B C W Wong,Biomedical Sciences)
(Dr J A Tanner,Biomedical Sciences)
(Dr. B Gao,Biomedical Sciences)
(Dr. M C H Cheung,Biomedical Sciences)
(Prof D Chan,Biomedical Sciences)
Course Objectives This is an advanced experimental-based course for students majoring in Biochemistry and related disciplines.  The aim is to provide the necessary training for students to pursuit postgraduate research education and potential employment in a scientific laboratory/industry environment.
Course Contents & Topics Hands-on experiments using advanced techniques in biochemistry, molecular and cell biology, and bioinformatics.  Students will also have the opportunity to familiarize themselves with modern instruments used in life sciences.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 explain the basic principles of current advanced techniques commonly used in biochemistry and molecular biology
CLO 2 apply and perform these techniques in other novel experimental settings
CLO 3 critically evaluate experimental data
CLO 4 design alternative approaches to test or validate hypotheses
CLO 5 write a concise experimental report using correct terminologies and nomenclatures
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOC3604
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2017 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2016 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2015 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2014 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        1st sem    Examination Dec     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Comprehensive and in-depth understanding of the principles and applications of advance technologies in biochemistry; clear and effective ability to identify problems and generate solutions relating to applications in a laboratory setting; clear evidence of ability to evaluate experimental data; cohesive and systematic planning and organization of experimental design and presentation of experimental data.
B Comprehensive understanding of the principles and applications of advance technologies in biochemistry; clear ability to identify problems and generate solutions relating to applications in a laboratory setting; evidence of ability to evaluate experimental data; systematic planning and organization of experimental design and presentation of experimental data.
C Sound understanding of the principles and applications of advance technologies in biochemistry; sound ability to identify problems and generate solutions relating to applications in a laboratory setting; some evidence of ability to evaluate experimental data; satisfactory planning and organization of experimental design and presentation of experimental data.
D Superficial understanding of the principles and applications of advance technologies in biochemistry; limited ability to identify problems and generate solutions relating to applications in a laboratory setting; some awareness of ability to evaluate experimental data; some evidence of planning and organization of experimental design and presentation of experimental data.
Fail Lack of understanding of the principles and applications of advance technologies in biochemistry; lack of ability to identify problems and generate solutions relating to applications in a laboratory setting; lack of evidence of ability to evaluate experimental data; insufficient evidence of planning and organization of experimental design and presentation of experimental data.
Course Type Lecture with laboratory component course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Laboratory 72
Lectures 12
Tutorials 6
Reading / Self study 76
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments 50 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Examination One 3-hour written examination 50 CLO 1,2,3,4
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Wilson K, Walker JM (2005) Principles and Techniques of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
Course Website NIL
Additional Course Information NIL


BIOC4966 Biochemistry internship (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biomedical Sciences Quota 20
Course Co-ordinator Prof J D Huang, Biomedical Sciences < jdhuang@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (All academic staff in Biochemistry Major,Biomedical Sciences)
(Prof J D Huang,Biomedical Sciences)
Course Objectives This course aims to offer students the opportunities to gain work experience in the industry related to their major of study.  The workplace learning experience would be of great benefit to the students to apply their knowledge gained in the study to the real work environments.  Students have to take on at least 160 hours of internship work either within the University or outside the University arranged by the School/Departments.
Course Contents & Topics 1. Within the university: The student will be supervised by a staff member (Supervisor), working on a project or various tasks as instructed by the Supervisor.

2. Outside the university: The student will work in an external agency related to the major of study. The student will be supervised under a staff member of the external agency (the External Supervisor) and a staff member of the Department/School of the student (the Internal Supervisor).
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 recognize the strengths and limitations of their area of training or expertise
CLO 2 examine the role of science in our society
CLO 3 acquire problem-solving skills to solve novel and ill-defined problems
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in at least 24 credits of advanced level (level 3 or 4) disciplinary core/elective courses in Biochemistry Major including BIOC3604.
This capstone course is for Biochemistry Major students only.
The earliest that a student is allowed to take this capstone course is their year 3 study.
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2017 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2016 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2015 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2014 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        1st sem    2nd sem    Summer    Examination No Exam     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade Pass/Fail
Grade Descriptors
Pass Able to apply knowledge to solve problems in the workplace. Successfully handles and carries out the work required in the job or assigned by supervisor(s). Establishes effective collaboration and communication with supervisor(s), colleagues, and clients in the job. Successfully fulfills the requirements set out in the Course Description regarding working hours, written and oral report, and evaluation by supervisor(s), etc. Students demonstrating excellent performance in the above would be awarded a grade of "Distinction".
Fail Very limited or no ability to solve problems in the workplace. Fails to handle or carry out the work required in the job or assigned by supervisor(s). Fails to establish effective collaboration or communication with supervisor(s), other colleagues, or clients in the job. Fails to satisfy the requirements set out in the Course Description regarding working hours, written and oral report, or evaluation by supervisor(s), etc.
Course Type Internship
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Internship work it is expected that students are to work at least 160 hours (or the equivalent of 4 weeks full-time) 160
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Oral presentation 30 CLO 1,2,3
Supervisor's feedback 30 CLO 3
Written report 40 CLO 1,2,3
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
NIL
Course Website NIL
Additional Course Information Satisfactory completion of this course can be counted towards the Capstone requirement.  Details of internship will be recorded on the student's transcript.  This course will be assessed on "Pass/Fail" basis. Students who are interested to enrol in this course should contact the Department to obtain the approval.
Enrolment of this course is not conducted via the online course selection system and should be made through the relevant Department/School office after approval has been obtained from the course coordinator.


BIOC4999 Biochemistry project (12 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biomedical Sciences Quota 25
Course Co-ordinator Dr N S Wong, Biomedical Sciences < nswong@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (All academic staff in Biochemistry Major,Biomedical Sciences)
(Dr N S Wong,Biomedical Sciences)
Course Objectives To enable students to acquire the basic skills in scientific research emphasizing on critical and analytical reasoning, free and creative thinking, scholarly communication (both orally and in writing), research integrity, teamwork and time management.  The course is particularly useful for those students who intend to pursue a career in life science either in research or industry.
Course Contents & Topics Project-related topics in biochemistry, cell, molecular and developmental biology.
Experimental methods in protein and nucleic acid biochemistry; bioinformatics and cell biology.
Critical appraisal of current science literature
Formulation of research questions
Design of experiments.
Data analysis and interpretation.
Scientific writing
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 describe recent research development in a defined area of biochemistry and molecular biology
CLO 2 formulate research questions and design experiments to address these questions
CLO 3 apply appropriate experimental techniques to solve research problems
CLO 4 manage and interpret experimental results
CLO 5 develop scientific writing skills and logically report their research findings
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in at least 24 credits of advanced level (level 3 or 4) disciplinary core/elective courses in Biochemistry Major including 4 of the following 5 courses: BIOL3401, BIOC3601, BIOC3604, BIOC4610 and BIOC4613.
BIOC4610 and BIOC4613 can be taken concurrently with this course.
This capstone course is for Biochemistry Major students only.
This capstone course is ONLY opened to students who are in year 3 or above in the Biochemistry Major program.
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2017 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2016 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2015 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2014 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        Year long    Examination No Exam     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Plans and executes a sophisticated and creative experimental investigation, framing the research question within existing knowledge. Displays tenacity and commitment, generating a meaningful body of data that is analysed with insight and comprehensively evaluated in the context of the original research question. Works proactively with a supervisor and other co-workers to enhance practical and scientific writing skills. Communicates the findings to a broader audience in an effective and scholarly way and responds knowledgeably to questions. Excellent time-management skills.
B Plans and executes a detailed experimental investigation, framing the research question within existing knowledge. Works with commitment, generating a sufficient body of data that is analysed and evaluated in the context of the original research question with skill and understanding. Works constructively with a supervisor and other co-workers to enhance practical and scientific writing skills. Clearly communicates the findings to a broader audience and responds knowledgeably to most questions. Able to time-manage effectively.
C Plans and executes an experimental investigation, attempting to contextualize the research question. Works with adequate commitment in order to generate sufficient data for a reasonable analysis and evaluation in the context of the original research question. Works with a supervisor and other co-workers to improve practical and scientific writing skills. Communicates the findings to a broader audience with reasonable clarity and responds to most questions. Acceptable time-management skills.
D Plans and executes a rudimentary experimental investigation, showing a limited ability to contextualize the research question. Displays minimal commitment when collecting data and is only able to undertake a superficial analysis and evaluation. Works reluctantly with a supervisor and other co-workers to develop practical and scientific writing skills. Displays weak communication skills when presenting the findings to a broader audience. Poor time-management skills.
Fail Plans and executes an experimental investigation that is flawed, ineffective or overly simplistic, that is lacking a valid scientific context. Shows no commitment when collecting data and produces an incoherent analysis and evaluation. Works in isolation, thus failing to improve practical and scientific writing skills. Displays weak communication skills when presenting the findings to a broader audience. No time-management skills.
Course Type Project-based course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Reading / Self study 240
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Dissertation 60 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Oral presentation including continuous assessment (15%) 40 CLO 5
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
None prescribed
Course Website NIL
Additional Course Information NIL


BIOL1110 From molecules to cells (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 420
Course Co-ordinator Prof B K C Chow, Biological Sciences < bkcc@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr C S C Lo,Biological Sciences)
(Dr J W Zhang,Biological Sciences)
(Dr K W Y Yuen,Biological Sciences)
(Prof B K C Chow,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives This course aims to provide basic conceptual understanding of the biology of molecules and cells to underpin later studies in applied biology, genetics, biochemistry, nutrition, biotechnology, microbiology, plant and animal physiology and developmental biology.
Course Contents & Topics An issue-based approach will be adopted to enable students to integrate basic concepts in molecules and cells and to inspire further investigation through the exploration of contemporary biological issues. The course is divided into 4 parts and the following is a list of some of the questions to be asked and discussed:
Genes and inheritance: How do children resemble their parents? What is the central dogma of biology? What are the rules of genetic inheritance? What determines gender and sexuality? Why is that children resemble, but not identical to, their parents? What happen if some genes are non-functional or mutated?
Metabolism and Health: How are diets related to good health? Do all humans have the same dietary requirements? Why can't we live without plants?
Cells and cell division: What are the common features in a cell? How do cells communicate and assemble themselves to form tissues and organs? What is a cell cycle and how it is regulated? What happens if cell-cycle control system goes wrong? How newly formed cells commit themselves for differentiation?
Genetic engineering and modern biology: To what extent can genes be modified? Is gene therapy the future of medicines? Is genetically modified food safe for consumption? What are the Genome Projects and why have they been important?
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 understand the relationships between genes in a genome and the inherited phenotypes expressed in a living organism
CLO 2 learn the underlying principle on how mutation of a gene can lead to the development of a genetic disease
CLO 3 understand the importance of dietary intake of biomolecules in relationship to good health
CLO 4 describe various stages in a cell division and that disturbance of this process may result in cancer development
CLO 5 describe concepts used in genetic engineering
CLO 6 know some applications of genetic engineering in gene therapy and production of genetically modified food
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
NIL
Students who wish to take this course are expected to have taken HKDSE Biology and/or Chemistry or equivalent.  For students without HKDSE Chemistry, they are encouraged to take CHEM1041 concurrently or before.
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology (Intensive) ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2018 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2 >
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,3,4 >
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) < PLO 1,2,4 >
2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1 >
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2 >
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology (Intensive) < PLO 1,2 >
2017 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2017 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2 >
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,3,4 >
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1 >
2017 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2 >
2016 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2016 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2 >
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,3,4 >
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1 >
2016 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2 >
2015 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2015 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2 >
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,3,4 >
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1 >
2015 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2 >
2014 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2014 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2 >
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,3,4 >
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1 >
2014 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        1st sem    2nd sem    Examination Dec    May     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough mastery at an advanced level of extensive knowledge required for attaining all the course learning outcomes. Show strong analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, with evidence of original thought, and ability to apply knowledge to a wide range of complex, familiar and unfamiliar situations. Apply highly effective organizational skills. Writings consistently demonstrate informed, thoughtful intellectual engagement with broad range of relevant concepts.
B Demonstrate substantial command of a broad range of knowledge required for attaining at least most of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, and ability to apply knowledge to familiar and some unfamiliar situations. Apply effective organizational skills. Writings mostly demonstrate informed, thoughtful intellectual engagement with broad range of relevant concepts.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete command of knowledge required for attaining most of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of some analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, and ability to apply knowledge to most familiar situations. Apply moderately effective organizational skills. Writings mostly indicate informed, intellectual engagement with concepts or theories but not always with sufficient depth, breadth or understanding.
D Demonstrate partial but limited command of knowledge required for attaining some of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of some coherent and logical thinking, but with limited analytical and critical abilities. Show limited ability to apply knowledge to solve problems. Apply limited or barely effective organizational skills. Writings indicate some intellectual engagement with concepts or theories but mostly at a superficial level.
Fail Demonstrate little or no evidence of command of knowledge required for attaining the course learning outcomes. Lack of analytical and critical abilities, logical and coherent thinking. Show very little or no ability to apply knowledge to solve problems. Organizational skills are minimally effective or ineffective. Writings reveal an absence of intellectual engagement with concepts or theories. Writings are irrelevant or superficial.
Course Type Lecture-based course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Lectures 36
Tutorials 12
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Examination 60 CLO 1,2,3,4,5,6
Test 40 CLO 1,2,3,4,5,6
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
NIL
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk/
Additional Course Information Quota in 1st Semester: 210
Quota in 2nd Semester: 210


   <<< This course is not offered in 2018 - 2019. Course details are subject to change. >>>
BIOL1111 Introductory microbiology (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 80
Course Co-ordinator ---, Biological Sciences
Teachers Involved (---,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives To introduce students to the diversity and function of microorganisms; and relate this to their importance in the natural environment, disease and public health, food production and spoilage and the biotechnology industry.
Course Contents & Topics Evolutionary diversity of bacteria, archaea, eukarya and viruses; Metabolic strategies, cell biology and genetics; Microbial ecology, marine microbiology, terrestrial microbiology; Microbial interactions with animals and plants; The human microbiome; Medical microbiology and immunology; Biotechnology applications; Food spoilage and food fermentations.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 describe the key features of the major microbial phyla and place them in an evolutionary context
CLO 2 explain the major physiological and genetic processes in prokaryotes and eukaryotic microorganisms and compare the similarities and differences between these two domains
CLO 3 identify the microorganisms involved and their role in ecological processes, human disease and medicine, food production and spoilage, and biotechnology
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
NIL
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2U000C00 Course not offered under any Major/Minor/Professional core
2014 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
Course to PLO Mapping 2014 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 N        To be confirmed Examination To be confirmed
Offer in 2019 - 2020 N
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A (85-100%) Meets the standard of excellence. All criteria are addressed. Organization of ideas and clarity are excellent. Additional reading or research is evident. Ideas show an exceptional understanding of concepts. Arguments are highly persuasive and show excellent judgment and prioritization of issues. Presentation is highly creative and appealing.
B (70-84%) Approaches the standard of excellence. All criteria are addressed. Organization of ideas and clarity are very good. Ideas show a complete understanding of concepts. Arguments are persuasive and prioritize major issues. Presentation is creative and appealing.
C (55-69%) Meets an acceptable standard. All criteria are addressed. Organization of ideas and clarity are sufficient. Ideas show an effective understanding of concepts. Arguments identify major issues. Presentation is appealing but may lack clarity.
D (45-54%) Below acceptable standard. Most criteria are addressed. Organization of ideas and clarity are weak. Ideas show an incomplete understanding of concepts. Arguments are not persuasive. Presentation lacks creativity or is not appealing.
Fail (<45%) Unacceptable. Inability to identify major criteria. Very weak organization of ideas and clarity. Ideas show a lack of understanding of concepts. No coherent argument. Presentation lacks creativity or is unappealing.
Course Type Lecture with laboratory component course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Laboratory 24
Lectures 24
Tutorials 6
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Examination 70 CLO 1,2,3
Laboratory reports 30 CLO 3
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Brock Biology of Microorganisms, Pearson Benjamin Cummings, 12th Edition, 2009 [HKU library call number 576.B86].
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk/
Additional Course Information


BIOL1201 Introduction to food and nutrition (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 190
Course Co-ordinator Dr J M F Wan, Biological Sciences < jmfwan@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr C B Chan,Biological Sciences)
(Dr J M F Wan,Biological Sciences)
(Dr L Zhang,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives To enable student to appreciate the multidisciplinary nature of the study of Food and Nutrition. From the farmer's field to the dinner table, a basic understanding of the general properties of macro and micronutrients food production, processing and storage will be covered. Food safety, food selection behaviour as well as balanced nutrition as part of life style instrumental to good health will be discussed.    

This is an independent course which can be taken by students from various disciplines. It also prepares students for further studies in Food and Nutritional Science.
Course Contents & Topics Topics will include food composition and functional properties of major nutrients; food additives; food hygiene, safety and regulation; determinants of food choice; examples of complex processed foods; healthy eating-concepts and practice; essential nutrients; diet and disease relationship.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 understand the key components of food and be able to discuss their functional properties
CLO 2 understand the significance of food safety and be able to identify sources of contamination
CLO 3 understand the concept of a balanced diet
CLO 4 critically assess health problems associate with malnutrition
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
NIL
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,4 >
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,4 >
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,4 >
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,4 >
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,4 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        1st sem    Examination Dec     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough grasp of the subject matter covered. Show exceptional ability to articulate concepts and integrate knowledge. Demonstrate highly effective organization / writing skills.
B Demonstrate substantial grasp of the subject matter covered. Show full capacity to use the appropriate concepts and assimilate the materials to solve problems. Demonstrate effective organization / writing skills.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete grasp of the subject matter covered. Show ability to apply concepts to solve simple problems. Demonstrate adequate organization / writing skills.
D Demonstrate partial but limited grasp, with retention of some relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Misunderstanding of the materials is not uncommon. Ability to apply concepts and solve simple problems is limited. Demonstrate basic organization / writing skills.
Fail Demonstrate little or no grasp, with retention of little relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Fail to understand concepts and show minimal competence in problem solving. Demonstrate poor organization and writing skills.
Course Type Lecture-based course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Lectures 36
Tutorials student-centered learning 12
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments 30 CLO 1,2,3,4
Examination 70 CLO 1,2,3,4
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Hotchkiss J.H. & Porter N.N. Food Science. Chapman & Hall, 1995
Fenema O.R. Food Chemistry. Marcel Dekker, 1996
Brown A. Understanding Food : Principles and Preparation. Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, 2011
Whitney E. & Rolfes S.R. Understanding Nutrition. Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, 2011
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk/
Additional Course Information


BIOL1309 Evolutionary diversity (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 250
Course Co-ordinator Prof R M K Saunders, Biological Sciences < saunders@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr C Yau,Biological Sciences)
(Dr M Yasuhara,Biological Sciences)
(Prof R M K Saunders,Biological Sciences)
(Prof Y Sadovy,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives To provide students with an introduction to the diversity of plant and animal life.  Recent research has resulted in fundamental changes in our understanding of evolutionary history (phylogeny).  Current evolutionary trees will be used as the basis for a survey of different groups in phylogenetic sequence, and for understanding how structures, processes and behaviours have changed through time.
Course Contents & Topics Introduction to the methodology for reconstructing the sequence of past evolutionary events (cladistics); algae (Rhodophyta, Phaeophyta and Chlorophyta); non-vascular plants (Hepatophyta, Anthocerophyta and Bryophyta); seedless vascular plants (Lycophyta, Psilophyta, Sphenophyta and Pterophyta); seed plants (Cycadophyta, Ginkgophyta, Coniferophyta, Gnetophyta and Anthophyta); invertebrates (Cnidaria, Platyhelminthes, Annelida, Mollusca, Nematoda, Arthropoda and Echinodermata); fish (Chondrichthyes and Actinopterygii); amphibians (Batrachomorpha); reptiles (Anapsida, Lepidosauromorpha and Archosauromorpha); and mammals (Monotremata, Metatheria and Eutheria).
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 interpret phylogenies in order to understand the relatedness of taxonomic groups and the pattern of evolutionary changes in structures, processes and behaviours
CLO 2 describe the characteristics of different evolutionary lineages of plants and animals and recall the names of the main taxonomic groups
CLO 3 explain the possible selective advantages of the highlighted structures, processes and behaviours
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
NIL
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology (Intensive) ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Major in Earth System Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Major in Earth System Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Major in Earth System Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6 >
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2,3 >
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology (Intensive) < PLO 1,2,3 >
2017 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2017 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2,3 >
2016 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2016 Major in Earth System Science < PLO 1,2 >
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,3 >
2016 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2,3 >
2015 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2015 Major in Earth System Science < PLO 1,2 >
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,3 >
2015 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2,3 >
2014 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2014 Major in Earth System Science < PLO 1,2 >
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,3 >
2014 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2,3 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        2nd sem    Examination May     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough mastery at an advanced level of extensive knowledge required for attaining most or all of the course learning outcomes, with extensive use of named examples. Show evidence of significant critical abilities and logical thinking. Apply highly effective presentation skills.
B Demonstrate substantial command of knowledge required for attaining most of the course learning outcomes, with some use of named examples. Show evidence of critical abilities and logical thinking. Apply effective presentation skills.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete command of knowledge and skills required for attaining most of the course learning outcomes, with only limited use of named examples. Show evidence of some critical abilities and logical thinking. Apply moderately effective presentation skills.
D Demonstrate partial but limited command of knowledge and skills required for attaining some of the course learning outcomes, with insufficient use of named examples. Show evidence of limited critical abilities and logical thinking. Apply limited presentation skills.
Fail Demonstrate little or no evidence of command of knowledge and skills required for attaining the course learning outcomes, without use of named examples. Show little or no evidence of critical abilities and logical thinking. Presentational skills are minimally effective or ineffective.
Course Type Lecture with laboratory component course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Laboratory 36
Lectures 24
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Examination 70 CLO 1,2,3
Laboratory reports 30 CLO 1,2,3
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
P. H. Raven, R. F. Evert & S. E. Eichhorn: Biology of Plants (Freeman & Worth, New York, 2005, 7th ed.)
E. E. Ruppert & R. D. Barnes: Invertebrate Zoology (Saunders, 2003, 7th ed.)
TBC
Course Website http://www.biosch.hku.hk/ecology/lsc/
Additional Course Information


   <<< This course is not offered in 2018 - 2019. Course details are subject to change. >>>
BIOL1501 Bioethics (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 40
Course Co-ordinator ---, Biological Sciences
Teachers Involved (---,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives The aim is to explore the ethical implications of the latest major advances in biology and medicine.
Course Contents & Topics The course will discuss research ethic between student and mentor, and ethical implications in recent major advancements in biological and medical sciences.  Major areas to be discussed include but are not limited to: genetics, reproduction, disease diagnosis and therapy, development, transplantation, aging, dying, environment, and the use of animals in research.  Ethical and moral principles and implications for social framework and public policy raised by these advances will be discussed.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 familiarize with the current ethical theories, discussions, and arguments taking place in the field of bioethics specifically related to the advancement of modern molecular biology and genomics
CLO 2 reflect upon and formulate in a professional manner their own opinions on these matters as well as to understand and enter into a respectful dialogue with those who possess another point of view
CLO 3 understand the basis of one's own position, as well as the basis of another person's opinion
CLO 4 deal with the quandaries that arise when facing modern medical technology and advancements
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
NIL
Course to PLO Mapping
Offer in 2018 - 2019 N        To be confirmed Examination To be confirmed
Offer in 2019 - 2020 N
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough grasp of the subject matter covered. Show strong analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, with evidence of creative ability and competence in professional-level problem solving. Critically use communication skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate highly effective individual as well as collaborative-based organizational and presentational skills.
B Demonstrate substantial grasp of the subject matter covered. Show evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking with some evidence of competence in professional-level problem solving. Use communication skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw generally appropriate conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate effective individual as well as collaborative-based organizational and presentational skills.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete grasp of the subject matter covered. Show some evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking with limited competence in professional-level problem solving. Use communication skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw moderately appropriate but sometimes erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate moderately individual as well as collaborative-based organizational and presentational skills.
D Demonstrate partial but limited grasp, with retention of some relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Show some evidence of coherent and logical thinking, but lacking competence in professional-level problem solving. Use communication skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw sometimes appropriate but often erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate individual as well as collaborative-based organizational and presentational skills of limited effectiveness.
Fail Demonstrate little or no grasp, with retention of little relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Show lack of coherent and logical thinking, and minimal competence in professional-level problem solving. Use communication skills and techniques and analysis of data and results ineffectively, leading generally to inappropriate and usually erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate ineffectiveness individual as well as collaborative-based organizational and presentational skills.
Course Type Lecture-based course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Lectures 36
Tutorials 12
Assessment 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments continuous assessment of essays, presentation and debate exercises 60 CLO 1,2,3,4
Examination 40 CLO 1,2,3,4
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
NIL
Library & web-based reading materials
Course Website NIL
Additional Course Information This course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers.


   <<< This course is not offered in 2018 - 2019. Course details are subject to change. >>>
BIOL1502 The gene (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 50
Course Co-ordinator ---, Biological Sciences
Teachers Involved (---,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives The objective is to expose students to the impacts of genes to the society.  Recent completion of the human genome and many agricultural crops and animals genomes, it brings not only promises of a better quality of life as well as lots of technical and ethical issues/challenges that general public need to deal with.  The goal of this course is to open up students from all backgrounds to this basic unit of inheritance called the gene and its impact on various scientific and social disciplines.
Course Contents & Topics Content/topics include:
Introduction and review of basic cell biology
Basic genetic - The gene
Basic Molecular Biology and Biotechnology - Recombinant DNA and cloning
Bacterial Genes - Gene and Environment
Human Genes/Human genome - history and its Impacts!
Human Genome - The Amazing discovery!
Genes and Biotechnology
Genes and Disease
Genes and Cancer
Animal and Plant Cloning
Genes and Agricultural/Food Biotechnology
Genes and Human Behavior
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 demonstrate understanding and to explain the principle of inheritance, recombinant DNA and cloning
CLO 2 gain deep understanding about the advancement of biotechnology
CLO 3 determine and explain the benefits and shortcomings of the application of biotechnology knowledge
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
NIL
Not for students with level 3 or above in HKDSE Biology or Combined Science with Biology component or equivalent.
Course to PLO Mapping
Offer in 2018 - 2019 N        To be confirmed Examination To be confirmed
Offer in 2019 - 2020 N
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough grasp of the subject matter covered. Show strong analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, with evidence of creative ability and competence in professional-level problem solving. Critically use communication skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate highly effective individual as well as collaborative-based organizational and presentational skills.
B Demonstrate substantial grasp of the subject matter covered. Show evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking with some evidence of competence in professional-level problem solving. Use communication skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw generally appropriate conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate effective individual as well as collaborative-based organizational and presentational skills.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete grasp of the subject matter covered. Show some evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking with limited competence in professional-level problem solving. Use communication skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw moderately appropriate but sometimes erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate moderately individual as well as collaborative-based organizational and presentational skills.
D Demonstrate partial but limited grasp, with retention of some relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Show some evidence of coherent and logical thinking, but lacking competence in professional-level problem solving. Use communication skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw sometimes appropriate but often erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate individual as well as collaborative-based organizational and presentational skills of limited effectiveness.
Fail Demonstrate little or no grasp, with retention of little relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Show lack of coherent and logical thinking, and minimal competence in professional-level problem solving. Use communication skills and techniques and analysis of data and results ineffectively, leading generally to inappropriate and usually erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate ineffectiveness individual as well as collaborative-based organizational and presentational skills.
Course Type Lecture-based course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Lectures 36
Tutorials 12
Reading / Self study including 45 hours on 15 essay/report writing, 30 presentation (include preparation) 93
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments discussion forum 35 CLO 1,2,3
Essay essays & written reports 25 CLO 1,2,3
Presentation poster & oral presentation 30 CLO 1,2,3
Test in-class participation & quizzes 10 CLO 1,2,3
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Library & web-based reading materials
Course Website NIL
Additional Course Information This course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers.


BIOL2101 Principles of food chemistry (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 30
Course Co-ordinator Dr J C Y Lee, Biological Sciences < jettylee@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr J C Y Lee,School of Biological Sciences)
(TBC,School of Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives To provide a basic understanding of chemistry in food systems, and to provide practical training in chemistry related to food science and nutrition.
Course Contents & Topics The course will cover the components of food, including water, proteins, carbohydrates and lipids, and minor components such as enzymes, vitamins, minerals, colorants, flavorants and additives. The physical and chemical properties of these important constituents of foods are covered in detail, and form the basis for understanding the reactions which occur during the production, processing, storage and handling of foods, and in understanding the methods used in analyzing foods
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 understand the functions and properties of major and minor food components
CLO 2 understand the basic chemistry behind food processing
CLO 3 understand how major chemical and biochemical reactions influence food quality
CLO 4 have integrated their knowledge of biological and chemical principles into a food science and nutrition context
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOL1201; and NOT for students who have passed in BIOL3201.
The course is only for students admitted in 2017-2018 or thereafter.
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,3 >
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,3 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        1st sem    Examination Dec     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough grasp of the subject matter covered. Show extensive knowledge and understanding of the topics covered and can readily apply this knowledge. Critically use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions.
B Demonstrate substantial grasp of the subject matter covered. Show thorough knowledge and understanding of the content and a high level of competence in the topics covered and able to apply this knowledge and skills to most situations. Use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw generally appropriate conclusions.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete grasp of the subject matter covered. The student has a sound knowledge and understanding of the main areas of content and has achieved an adequate level of competence in the topics covered. Use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw moderately appropriate conclusions.
D Demonstrate partial but limited grasp, with retention of some relevant information of the subject matter covered. Show a basic knowledge and understanding of the content and has achieved a limited level of competence in the topics covered. Use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw appropriate conclusions occasionally.
Fail Demonstrate little or no grasp, with retention of little relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Show elementary knowledge and understanding in few areas of the content and has achieved very limited competence in some of the topics covered. Use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results ineffectively, leading generally to inappropriate and usually erroneous conclusions.
Course Type Lecture with laboratory component course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Laboratory 36
Lectures 24
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments Laboratory reports 30 CLO 1,2,3,4
Examination 50 CLO 1,2,3,4
Test 20 CLO 1,2,3,4
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Fennema OR, Food Chemistry (Marcel Dekker 4th Ed, 2008)
Belitz HD, Grosch W, Schieberle, P, Food Chemistry (Springer 4th Ed, 2009)
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk
Additional Course Information The course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers


BIOL2102 Biostatistics (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 211
Course Co-ordinator Prof. K M Y Leung, Biological Sciences < kmyleung@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Prof. K M Y Leung,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives This course aims to familiarise students with biostatistics. The course will give to students the skills to understand, interpret, and critically evaluate the statistics used in biological and biomedical studies. The course will also introduce the students to fundamental principles of various statistical tests, basic computational tools for analysing data, choose the correct statistical test and avoid common statistical pitfalls.
Course Contents & Topics Introduction to Statistics and Probability; Different Probability Distributions including Normal Distribution; Describing, Exploring and Comparing Data; Hypothesis Testing and Inferential Statistics (Both Parametric and Non-Parametric Tests such as Chi square test, Student t tests, Mana-Whitney test, Wilcoxon test, Analysis of Variance, and Kruskal-Wallis test); Correlation and Regression; Power Analysis; Experimental design.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 formulate biological questions into statistical questions
CLO 2 design experiments effectively
CLO 3 appreciate and interpret statistics in scientific paper
CLO 4 use Excel and R to carry out common statistical computations
CLO 5 understand the assumptions of commonly used statistical methods
CLO 6 critically evaluate the scientific literature
CLO 7 create novel hypothesis for testing
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOC1600 or BIOL1110 or BIOL2306 or ENVS1301 or ENVS2002
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology (Intensive) ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Major in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Major in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Major in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Major in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) < PLO 1,2,4,5,6 >
2018 Major in Environmental Science < PLO 3 >
2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1 >
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2,3 >
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology (Intensive) < PLO 1,2,3 >
2017 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2017 Major in Environmental Science < PLO 3 >
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1 >
2017 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2,3 >
2016 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2016 Major in Environmental Science < PLO 3 >
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1 >
2016 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2,3 >
2015 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2015 Major in Environmental Science < PLO 3 >
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1 >
2015 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2,3 >
2014 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2014 Major in Environmental Science < PLO 3 >
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1 >
2014 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2,3 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        2nd sem    Examination May     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough grasp of the subject and skills required for attaining all the course learning outcomes. Show strong analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, with evidence of original thought. Apply highly effective computational skills and techniques for basic statistical analyses. Be able to critically use data and statistical results to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions. Apply highly effective organizational and presentational skills.
B Demonstrate substantial grasp of the subject and skills required for attaining at least most of the course learning outcomes. Present evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking. Apply effective computational skills and techniques for basic statistical analyses. Be able to correctly use data and statistical results to draw appropriate conclusions. Apply effective organizational and presentational skills.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete grasp of the subject and skills required for attaining some of the course learning outcomes. Present evidence of some analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking. Apply moderately effective computational skills and techniques for basic statistical analyses. Demonstrate mostly correct but some erroneous use of data and statistical results to draw appropriate conclusions. Apply moderately effective organizational and presentational skills.
D Demonstrate partial and limited grasp of the subject and skills required for attaining some of the course learning outcomes. Present evidence of some coherent and logical thinking, but with limited analytical and critical abilities. Apply limited or barely effective computational skills and techniques for basic statistical analyses. Demonstrate limited ability to use data and statistical results to draw appropriate conclusions. Apply limited or barely effective organizational and presentational skills.
Fail Demonstrate evidence of little or no grasp of the subject and skills required for attaining any of the course learning outcomes. Present evidence of little or lack of analytical and critical abilities, logical and coherent thinking. Apply minimally effective or ineffective computational skills and techniques for basic statistical analyses. Demonstrate misuse of data and statistical results and/or unable to draw appropriate conclusions. Apply minimally effective or ineffective organizational and presentational skills.
Course Type Lecture-based course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Lectures 36
Tutorials including demonstrations and projects 24
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments 70 CLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7
Examination 30 CLO 1,3,5
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Zar, J. H. (2010). Biostatistical Analysis, 5th edition. Pearson.
Dytham, C. (1999). Choosing and Using Statistics: A Biologist's Guide. Oxford: Blackwell Science.
Goureia Oliveira, A.G. (2013). Biostatistics Decoded. Wiley (e-book via ebrary).
Good, P.I. (2013). Introduction to Statistics through Resampling Methods and R. Wiley (e-book via ebrary).
Verzani, J. (2014). Using R for Introductory Statistics. 2nd edition. CRC Press. [e-book via ebrary]
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk/
Additional Course Information Learning Support Centre: http://www.biosch.hku.hk/ecology/lsc/biol2102/


BIOL2103 Biological sciences laboratory course (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 204
Course Co-ordinator Dr W Y Lui, Biological Sciences < wylui@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr A Yan,Biological Sciences)
(Dr W Y Lui,Biological Sciences)
(Prof B K C Chow,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives The objective is to provide students a comprehensive training in basic laboratory techniques used in modern biological studies. The course will cover a number of techniques used by molecular biologists and microbiologists to conduct scientific research.
Course Contents & Topics This course will be divided into three modules and each module will have 3 laboratory sessions.

Module one: Nucleic acid analysis
DNA & RNA isolation, spectrometry, gel electrophoresis, restriction enzyme analysis and DNA sequence analysis.

Module two: Protein analysis
Centrifugation, chromatography and SDS-PAGE electrophoresis.

Module three: Microbiology
Microscopy, observation of microorganisms and staining of bacteria, isolation of pure cultures by streaking and serial dilution, enumeration of microbial cells by Petroff-Hausser counting chamber, and turbidity. Identification and classification of microbes from natural source and statistical analysis.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 demonstrate knowledge in proper use of simple research equipment
CLO 2 demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how and why certain techniques are used in a research setting
CLO 3 master some basic laboratory techniques for carrying out experiments
CLO 4 understand the different ways that microorganisms were categorized according to their size, shape, colour and response to dye etc. and how they were counted
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOL1110
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology (Intensive) ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,3,4 >
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) < PLO 1,2,4 >
2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 5,6 >
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2,3 >
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology (Intensive) < PLO 1,2,3 >
2017 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,3,4 >
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 5,6 >
2017 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2,3 >
2016 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,3,4 >
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 5,6 >
2016 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2,3 >
2015 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,3,4 >
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 5,6 >
2015 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2,3 >
2014 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,3,4 >
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 5,6 >
2014 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2,3 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        1st sem    2nd sem    Examination Dec    May     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough mastery at an advanced level of extensive knowledge required for attaining all the course learning outcomes. Show strong analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, with evidence of original thought. Apply highly effective lab skills and techniques. Critical use of data and results to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions. Apply highly effective organizational and presentational skills.
B Demonstrate substantial command of a broad range of knowledge required for attaining at least most of the course learning outcomes. Evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking. Apply effective lab skills and techniques. Correct use of data of results to draw appropriate conclusions. Apply effective organizational and presentational skills.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete command of knowledge required for attaining most of the course learning outcomes. Evidence of some analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking. Apply moderately effective lab skills and techniques. Mostly correct but some erroneous use of data and results to draw appropriate conclusions. Apply moderately effective organizational and presentational skills.
D Demonstrate partial but limited command of knowledge required for attaining some of the course learning outcomes. Evidence of some coherent and logical thinking, but with limited analytical and critical abilities. Apply partially effective lab skills and techniques. Limited ability to use data and results to draw appropriate conclusions. Apply limited or barely effective organizational and presentational skills.
Fail Demonstrate little or no evidence of command of knowledge required for attaining the course learning outcomes. Evidence of little or lack of analytical and critical abilities, logical and coherent thinking. Apply minimally effective or ineffective lab skills and techniques. Misuse of data and results and/or unable to draw appropriate conclusions. Organization and presentational skills are minimally effective or ineffective.
Course Type Laboratory and workshop course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Laboratory 11 laboratory sessions (4 hours each) 44
Tutorials lecture/tutorials 18
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Laboratory reports plus lab performance 60 CLO 1,2,3,4
Test 1 hour final examination 40 CLO 1,2
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
NIL
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk/
Additional Course Information Quota 102 - 1st Semester
Lab A on Wed. with 36 students and Lab. B on Thurs. with 66 students
Quota 102 - 2nd Semester
Lab C on Thurs. with 66 students; Lab. D on Fri. with 36 students


BIOL2220 Principles of biochemistry (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 100
Course Co-ordinator Dr C S C Lo, Biological Sciences < clivelo@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr C S C Lo,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives This course is designed to provide undergraduate (non-biochemistry major) an overview of fundamental concepts in biochemistry as well as hands-on experience in biochemical techniques.
Course Contents & Topics An introduction to various biomolecules in terms of their structures, functions, syntheses and metabolisms, with emphasis on amino acids, proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids.  The correlations between their biochemical properties and their roles in various life processes will be illustrated.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 describe the key structural features of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and nucleotides
CLO 2 understand the basic enzyme kinetic properties
CLO 3 explain how the common sugars, fatty acids and amino acids are metabolized and synthesized in living cells
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOL1110; and
Not for students who have passed in BIOC2600, or have already enrolled in this course.
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology (Intensive) ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2018 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1 >
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2 >
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology (Intensive) < PLO 1,2 >
2017 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2017 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1 >
2017 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2 >
2016 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2016 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1 >
2016 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2 >
2015 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2015 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1 >
2015 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2 >
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1 >
2014 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        1st sem    Examination Dec     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough mastery at an advanced level of extensive knowledge and skills required for attaining all the course learning outcomes. Show strong analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, with evidence of original thought, and ability to apply knowledge to a wide range of complex, familiar and unfamiliar situations. Integration of the full range of appropriate theories, principles, evidence and techniques
B Demonstrate substantial command of a broad range of knowledge and skills required for attaining at least most of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, and ability to apply knowledge to familiar and some unfamiliar situations. General integration of theories, principles, evidence and techniques
C Demonstrate general but incomplete command of knowledge and skills required for attaining most of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of some analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, and ability to apply knowledge to most familiar situations. Some partial integration of theories, principles, evidence and techniques
D Demonstrate partial but limited command of knowledge and skills required for attaining some of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of some coherent and logical thinking, but with limited analytical and critical abilities. Show limited ability to apply knowledge to solve problems. Limited integration of theories, principles, evidence and techniques
Fail Demonstrate little or no evidence of command of knowledge and skills required for attaining the course learning outcomes. Lack of analytical and critical abilities, logical and coherent thinking. Show very little or no ability to apply knowledge to solve problems. Little or no or inapt integration of theories, principles, evidence and techniques
Course Type Lecture with laboratory component course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Laboratory 3 laboratory sessions 24
Lectures 24
Tutorials 12
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Examination 60 CLO 1,2,3
Laboratory reports 10 CLO 1,2,3
Test 30 CLO 1,2,3
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
L.A. Moran, H.R. Horton, K.G. Scrimgeour, M.D. Perry: Principles of Biochemistry 5th edition (Pearson International Edition)
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk/
Additional Course Information


BIOL2306 Ecology and evolution (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 80
Course Co-ordinator Prof D Dudgeon, Biological Sciences < ddudgeon@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Prof D Dudgeon,Biological Sciences)
(Prof G A Williams (Field course component only),Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives The interaction between organisms and their environment is addressed using an issue-based approach in order to explains how the ecology of plants and animals has been shaped by evolution through interactions with their living and non-living environment. The course also demonstrates how we can understand and explain the significance of what we see in nature using scientific methods.  A field course component provides the opportunity to investigate how the environment influences community composition, biodiversity and adaptive radiation in a variety of habitats.
Course Contents & Topics The environment influences organisms profoundly. It affects their present-day ecology (determining where they live and how many can survive there) and, through natural selection acting over past generations, influences their form and adaptations. Present day human-induced changes to the environment are also responsible for endangering species and degrading their habitats. This introductory course introduces some basic scientific principles of ecology and evolution, showing how they are linked to the environment by physiological tolerances and evolutionary adaptation which, in turn, lead to specialization and generate biodiversity. Individuals and their interactions will be a major focus of the course together with discussion of population dynamics, community structuring, life histories, and niche dynamics. The principles of ecology and evolution resulting from interaction with the environment will also be demonstrated by describing the origins of modern humans, including our fossil record and relationship to other primates, and the main ecological transformations caused by humans and their environmental impacts. The course will conclude with an account of the importance of biodiversity, and the factors that threaten it globally.
Lectures are complemented by a 5-day residential field course during the Reading Week when students visit a variety of Hong Kong habitats to study their biodiversity, community composition and the relationship between organisms and their environment
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 understand how scientific methods (hypotheses, experiments, comparisons) are used to investigate ecological and evolutionary processes
CLO 2 understand the basic mechanism of natural selection, and how interactions with the environment lead to adaptation and generate biodiversity
CLO 3 understand that ecology and behaviour can be interpreted in the light of selective pressures from the environment upon individual organisms
CLO 4 understand the ecological factors influencing evolution, using the human evolutionary tree as an example
CLO 5 understand the community ecology and biodiversity of selected Hong Kong habitats, and typical adaptations of organisms found there
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOL1110 or BIOL1309 or ENVS1301 or ENVS1401
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology (Intensive) ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Major in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Major in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Major in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biological Sciences ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Major in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2 >
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6 >
2018 Major in Environmental Science < PLO 1,2,3 >
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2 >
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology (Intensive) < PLO 1,2 >
2017 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2 >
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2017 Major in Environmental Science < PLO 1,2,3 >
2017 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2 >
2016 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2 >
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2016 Major in Environmental Science < PLO 1,2,3 >
2016 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2 >
2015 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2 >
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2015 Major in Environmental Science < PLO 1,2,3 >
2015 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2 >
2014 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2 >
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2014 Major in Environmental Science < PLO 1,2,3 >
2014 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        1st sem    Examination Dec     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Evidence of complete or near-complete understanding and a thorough grasp of the subject as demonstrated by attainment of all learning outcomes, and excellent use of named (organism) examples, including local species and habitats. Show excellent organizational, presentational and/or analytical skills and fieldwork techniques. Excellent or outstanding (for A+) work relative to what is required at degree level.
B Evidence of substantial understanding and a good grasp of the subject as demonstrated by attainment of the majority of learning outcomes, and use of named (organism) examples, including local species and habitats. Show good organizational, presentational and/or analytical skills and fieldwork techniques. Work more than sufficient for what is required at degree level.
C Evidence of general understanding with an adequate (but incomplete) grasp of the subject, as demonstrated by general but incomplete attainment of most of the learning outcomes, with limited use of named (organism) examples. Show fair organizational, analytical, presentational and/or analytical skills and fieldwork techniques. Work sufficient for what is required for degree level.
D Evidence of retention of a minimum of relevant information and incomplete understanding of the subject (i.e. knowledge is very incomplete), as demonstrated by partial but limited attainment of learning outcomes. Insufficient familiarity with fieldwork techniques, habitats or organisms. Work merely (for D+) or barely (D) adequate for what is required at degree level.
Fail Evidence of poor or inadequate knowledge and understanding of the subject such that the majority of learning outcomes cannot be attained. Little or no evidence of familiarity with fieldwork techniques, habitats or organisms. Work fails to reach degree level.
Course Type Lecture with laboratory component course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Laboratory at least 36 hours field and laboratory work, as groups and individuals 36
Lectures 24 hours lectures, plus 10 hours of lectures during residential field course 34
Reading / Self study during the semester in the form of internet tutorials, assigned reading and a laboratory workshop 80
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments 30 CLO 5
Examination 70 CLO 1,2,3,4
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Boyd, R. & Silk, J.B. (1997) How Humans Evolved (4th Edition).  Norton, NY. (5th Edition e-book available in HKU library.)
Stiling, P. (2002) Ecology: Theories and Applications (4th Edition).  Prentice Hall, Singapore.
An up-to-date list of references to the primary scientific literature, background reading and/or internet resources relevant to each lecture will be provided on the course website.
Course Website http://www.biosch.hku.hk/ecology/lsc/
Additional Course Information A compulsory 5-day residential field component during the reading week.
Details of the location and cost of the residential field course, which will be held in the Reading week of semester 1, will be made available at the start of the semester.  Priority will be given to students majoring in BS and E&B.  Cost per head in 2018-2019 was $1000 (not refundable).


   <<< This course is not offered in 2018 - 2019. Course details are subject to change. >>>
BIOL2408 Green earth-plants and mankind (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 40
Course Co-ordinator Dr J S H Tsang, Biological Sciences < jshtsang@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr J S H Tsang,School of Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives This course is intended for students interested in the fundamentals of plant biology. The course will emphasize on the essential attributes of plants to humans. At the end of the course, students are expected to know the distinct features of plants and appreciate the importance of plants in our daily lives. Specific topics such as genetic engineering and the use of plants for food and medicine, will be addressed.
Course Contents & Topics The importance of plants to human. How to be a plant? Types of plant biotic interactions. Plant-plant interactions. Plants and pathogens. Phytohormones. Plants and environment. Genetic improvements in agriculture. You are what you eat? Medicinal plants.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 Realize how plant structure enables functions
CLO 2 Comprehend the essentials of plant growth and development
CLO 3 Understand the abilities of plants to detect, process, and interpret information from their surrounding environment
CLO 4 Recognize the interactions of plant with the living and non-living environment
CLO 5 Appreciate the contribution of plants to humans
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOL1110
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology (Intensive) ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology (Intensive) < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 N        To be confirmed Examination To be confirmed
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough mastery at an advanced level of extensive knowledge and skills required for attaining all the course learning outcomes. Demonstrate thorough grasp of the subject. Show strong analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, with evidence of original thought. Apply highly effective lab skills and techniques. Critical use of data and results to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions. Apply highly effective organizational and presentational skills.
B Demonstrate substantial command of a broad range of knowledge and skills required for attaining at least most of the course learning outcomes. Demonstrate substantial grasp of the subject. Show evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking. Apply effective lab skills and techniques. Correct use of data of results to draw appropriate conclusions. Apply effective organizational and presentational skills.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete command of knowledge and skills required for attaining most of the course learning outcomes. Demonstrate general but incomplete grasp of the subject. Evidence of some analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking. Apply moderately effective lab skills and techniques. Mostly correct but some erroneous use of data and results to draw appropriate conclusions. Apply moderately effective organizational and presentational skills.
D Demonstrate partial but limited command of knowledge and skills required for attaining some of the course learning outcomes Demonstrate partial but limited grasp, with retention of some relevant information, of the subject. Evidence of some coherent and logical thinking, but with limited analytical and critical abilities. Apply partially effective lab skills and techniques. Limited ability to use data and results to draw appropriate conclusions. Apply limited or barely effective organizational and presentational skills.
Fail Demonstrate little or no evidence of command of knowledge and skills required for attaining the course learning outcomes. Demonstrate evidence of little or no grasp of the knowledge and understanding of the subject. Evidence of little or lack of analytical and critical abilities, logical and coherent thinking. Apply minimally effective or ineffective lab skills and techniques. Misuse of data and results and/or unable to draw appropriate conclusions. Organization and presentational skills are minimally effective or ineffective.
Course Type Lecture with laboratory component course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Laboratory 24
Lectures 24
Tutorials 6
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments 15 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Examination 70 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Laboratory reports 15 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Core Textbooks
1.  Simpson, B.B. & M.C. Ogorzaly. 2014. Economic Botany: Plants in our World. McGraw-Hill.
References and Online Materials
1.  Teaching Tools in Plant Biology: http://www.plantcell.org/site/teachingtools/teaching.xhtml
2.  Levetin E. & McMahon, K. 2016. Plants & Society 7th Ed. McGraw Hill
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk
Additional Course Information This course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers.


   <<< This course is not offered in 2018 - 2019. Course details are subject to change. >>>
BIOL2409 Biotechnology industry and entrepreneurship (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 40
Course Co-ordinator Dr W B L Lim, Biological Sciences < bllim@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr W B Lim,School of Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives The course will give an overview of the innovative developments in biotech industry and provide the students with useful tools in learning how an exciting research idea can be turned into a viable business.
Course Contents & Topics The purpose of the course is to introduce you to the entrepreneurial process with a focus on the biotechnology
industry. The course will provide a thoughtful, practical guide to the process of successfully launching an
entrepreneurial venture. We place a special emphasis on the decision to become a biotech entrepreneur and how
to develop successful business ideas, however we will also discuss the process of moving from an idea to a biotech
firm. Topics on intellectual properties, patent laws, patent application process, licensing and fundraising will be
covered as well. Throughout the course, guest entrepreneurs, managers and directors of the biotech industry will
be presenting case studies and explain their involvement in various biotech and pharmaceutical companies.
Topics:
1. Introduction to Biotechnology Industry: 4 P in Biotechnology Business (3 hours)
2. IP rights: Patent application, Patent system, USPTO, SIPO, PCT (6 hours)
3. Licensing of IP rights (3 hours)
4. Technology Transfer Office and HKSTP (3 hours)
5. How to raise fund for startup companies (3 hours)?
6. Agrobiotechnology and Green Tech (Monsanto, Novozymes, etc) (4.5 hours)
7. Drug development and clinical trials (Gilead Sciences, Wuxi PharmaTech, etc). (6 hours)
8. Diagnostics business (BGI, Diagcor, etc) (4.5 hours)
9. Company analysis (3 hours)
10. Company Visit
11. Company analysis
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 understand and demonstrate knowledge of the development and management of biotechnology business
CLO 2 understand and demonstrate how discoveries and inventions are commercialized
CLO 3 navigate the various steps in the development of a biotechnology derived product: from bench, to scale-up,to market
CLO 4 gain technical and business knowledge of the biotechnology and bioprocessing industries
CLO 5 participate and contribute to the business side of scientific enterprises
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in 1110
NOT for students who have passed in BIOL3409.
This course is only for students admitted from 2018-2019 or thereafter.
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology (Intensive) ( Core/Compulsory )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology (Intensive) < PLO 1,2 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 N        To be confirmed Examination To be confirmed
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Students acquire exceptional skills and knowledge from the course and are capable of independently analyzing the business and technological developments of various biotechnology ventures.
B Students demonstrate a broad and in-depth understanding of the current developments in biotechnology industry and are capable of analyzing the business and technological developments of various biotechnology ventures under guidance.
C Students demonstrate a broad and in-depth understanding of the current developments in biotechnology industry.
D Students demonstrate a moderate understanding of the current developments in biotechnology industry.
Fail Students fail to demonstrate a moderate understanding of the current developments in biotechnology industry.
Course Type Lecture-based course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Field work 6
Group work Presentation 12
Lectures 36
Assessment 18
Reading / Self study 60
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments 60 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Presentation 20 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Test 20 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Thomas H. Byers, Richard C. Dorf, Andrew J. Nelson (2011) Technology Ventures: From Idea to Enterprise 3rd ed.
McGraw Hill
Company annual reports
Online materials
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk/
Additional Course Information This course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers.
Priority will be given to students majoring or minoring in MBB


BIOL3101 Animal behaviour (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 30
Course Co-ordinator Dr S Sin, Biological Sciences < sinyw@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr S Sin,School of Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives The purpose of this course is to introduce students with the diversity in animal behaviour and the means of understanding animal behaviour. The course will teach students the underlying mechanism and function of behaviour, and how did a particular behaviour develop and evolve.
Course Contents & Topics Why do animal behaviours vary among individuals and species? How do environment and ecological interactions influence behaviours? What are the underlying genetic mechanism of a particular behaviour? In this course, students will learn to think within the ecological and evolutionary perspectives on animal behaviour. Topics include behavioral ecology; behavioral genetics; reproductive behaviour; mating system; parental care; communication; foraging; learning; migration and biological rhythms; evolutionary stable strategies; sexual selection; altruism; and sociality in vertebrates and invertebrates. We will discuss several classical studies that form the foundation of this field, as well as more recent research that have led to current understanding of animal behaviour. This course will give students a unique perspective on the natural world and our own species.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 learn and appreciate the mechanism, function, development, and evolution of animal behaviour
CLO 2 understand the complexity of interactions between natural and sexual selection and animal behaviour
CLO 3 appreciate current theories that form basis for modern understanding of animal behaviour
CLO 4 learn the scientific reasoning and methodology in the field of Animal Behaviour
CLO 5 think analytically, based upon ecological and evolutionary principles, to explain the behaviours observed in the natural world and our own specie
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOL2306
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) < PLO 1,2,4,5,6 >
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        1st sem    Examination Dec     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Evidence of a thorough grasp of the subject in a broader comparative perspective as demonstrated by background reading and excellent use of named examples and case studies. Evidence of independent critical thought with excellent use of a broad range of fundamental concepts to draw insightful and logical conclusions. Show eagerness to learn, great abilities of independent work, effective presentation skills with excellent analytical argumentation. Excellent or outstanding work relative to what is required at degree level.
B Evidence of a good grasp of the subject as demonstrated by some background reading and appropriate use of named examples and some case studies. Evidence of good critical thought, although not necessarily original. Good and very good (but not outstanding) abilities of independent work, effective presentation skills with good analytical and logical argumentation. Good general command of acquired knowledge to draw meaningful and logical conclusions. Work more than sufficient for what is required at degree level.
C Demonstrate an adequate, but not coherent and incomplete grasp of the subject, with limited background reading and limited use of named examples and case studies. Some abilities of logical critical thinking, but not insightful and/or independent; only partial abilities to use acquired knowledge and work independently to draw meaningful conclusions. Fair presentation skills, with mostly correct argumentation, but limited (or no) abilities to integrate broader concepts. Work sufficient for what is required for degree level.
D Demonstrate some grasp of the subject, but partial and limited to the most basic concepts, examples, and limited (or none) case studies. Insufficient evidence of background reading, limited abilities of critical independent thinking, and not particularly effective presentation skills with generally weak logical argumentation and restricted ability of drawing appropriate conclusions. Work barely meets what is required at degree level.
Fail No evidence of basic minimum knowledge and understanding of the subject. No evidence of background reading and no familiarity with any relevant examples and case studies. Inadequate evidence of coherent logical thought; ineffective presentation skills with poor argumentation and no abilities to draw meaningful conclusions. Work fails to reach degree level.
Course Type Lecture with laboratory component course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Laboratory Lab work, field trips, or debates/presentations 24
Lectures 24
Tutorials 6
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments 50 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Examination 50 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
D. R. Rubenstein & J. Alcock. Animal Behavior: An Evolutionary Approach. Oxford University Press; 11th edition ; 2018.
N. B. Davies, J. R. Krebs & S. A. West. An Introduction to Behavioural Ecology. Wiley-Blackwell; 4th edition; 2012.
Course Website http://www.biosch.hku.hk/ecology/lsc
Additional Course Information This course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers.


BIOL3105 Animal physiology and environmental adaptation (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 50
Course Co-ordinator Prof A O L Wong, Biological Sciences < olwong@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr W Y Lui,Biological Sciences)
(Prof A O L Wong,Biological Sciences)
(Prof A S T Wong,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives The course covers the major aspects of animal physiology for environmental adaptation in terrestrial & aquatic habitats.  Stress will be given to the functional interactions between animals and the environment, especially on the mechanisms by which animals obtain resources for survival from the environment, detect environmental changes via sensory structures, and respond to adversities in the environment by altering their body forms & functions.
Course Contents & Topics Basic concepts of animal adaptation to environmental changes/extreme environment; Modification of energy metabolism according to oxygen availability; Different models of gaseous exchange for aquatic, inter-tidal, and terrestrial habitats; Cross-adaptation to different environment: air-breathing fish vs diving adaptations in mammals; Visual signals & differential levels of photoreception from protozoa to mammals; Background adaptation: functions & mechanisms for color presentation; Sound wave as environmental signals: functions & mechanisms of detection in aquatic & terrestrial habitats; Echo sounding in bats for navigation without visual signals; Behavioral, morphological & physiological adaptations in hostile environment: extreme hot vs freezing cold; salinity changes in aquatic habitats & water availability in terrestrial habitats on osmoregulation, water balance & nitrogenous metabolism.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 have a broad understanding on functional interactions between animals and their environment
CLO 2 appreciate the role of the environment in shaping the evolution of animal structures & functions
CLO 3 comprehend a wide range of physiological adaptations (both structurally & functionally) in coping with environmental stress and environmental changes
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOL2103 or BIOL2220 or BIOC2600 or MEDE2301
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2017 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2016 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2015 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2014 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        2nd sem    Examination May     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough mastery at an advanced level of extensive knowledge required for attaining all the course learning outcomes. Show strong analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, with evidence of original thought, and ability to apply knowledge to a wide range of complex, familiar and unfamiliar situations. Apply highly effective organizational skills. Writings consistently demonstrate informed, thoughtful intellectual engagement with broad range of relevant concepts.
B Demonstrate substantial command of a broad range of knowledge required for attaining at least most of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, and ability to apply knowledge to familiar and some unfamiliar situations. Apply effective organizational skills. Writings mostly demonstrate informed, thoughtful intellectual engagement with broad range of relevant concepts.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete command of knowledge required for attaining most of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of some analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, and ability to apply knowledge to most familiar situations. Apply moderately effective organizational skills. Writings mostly indicate informed, intellectual engagement with concepts or theories but not always with sufficient depth, breadth or understanding.
D Demonstrate partial but limited command of knowledge required for attaining some of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of some coherent and logical thinking, but with limited analytical and critical abilities. Show limited ability to apply knowledge to solve problems. Apply limited or barely effective organizational skills. Writings indicate some intellectual engagement with concepts or theories but mostly at a superficial level.
Fail Demonstrate little or no evidence of command of knowledge required for attaining the course learning outcomes. Lack of analytical and critical abilities, logical and coherent thinking. Show very little or no ability to apply knowledge to solve problems. Organizational skills are minimally effective or ineffective. Writings reveal an absence of intellectual engagement with concepts or theories. Writings are irrelevant or superficial.
Course Type Lecture-based course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Lectures 36
Tutorials 12
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Examination 70 CLO 1,2,3
Test test & continual assessment 30 CLO 1,2,3
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Christopher D. Moyes & Patricia M. Schulte (2015), Principles of Animal Physiology, Pearson.
Richard W. Hill, Gordon A. Wyse & Margaret Anderson (2012), Animal Physiology, Sinauer Associate.
E. N. Marieb (2012), Essentials of Human Anatomy & Physiology. Benjamin Cummings.
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk/
Additional Course Information Refer to the Website of School of Biological Sciences.
This course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers.


BIOL3107 Plant physiology (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 30
Course Co-ordinator Dr W K Yip, Biological Sciences < wkyip@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr W K Yip,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives To give an understanding of plant processes such as plant growth and development and their regulatory mechanisms.
Course Contents & Topics Discovery, assay, chemical nature, mechanism, structure-activity relationships, physiological effects, and signal transduction of plant hormones. Hormonal transport. Selected topics on plant growth and development including photo-morphogenesis, seed germination, dormancy, apical dominance, fruit ripening, leaf abscission, and plant defense.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 understand the study of plant biology using mutants in model plant Arabidopsis
CLO 2 understand biotechnological opportunities by manipulating plant gene expression
CLO 3 understand the regulation of plant growth and development by various plant hormones
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOL2103
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology (Intensive) ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology (Intensive) < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2017 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2016 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2015 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2 >
2014 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        1st sem    Examination Dec     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A In written examination: Exceptionally good organization and presentation, the discussion would be very clearly written and show evidence of originality. In practical sessions: excellent insight in to the practical aims; submit good reports.
B In written examination: coherent organization and clear presentation, the discussion would be a complete and critical response to questions. In practical sessions: full understanding of the practical aims; submit accurate reports.
C In written examination and practical sessions: Good in parts, but important points omitted. Might also have defects in presentation or be not very well written. Reasonably competent, but might show misunderstanding of the material: significant inaccuracies or errors.
D In written examination and practical sessions: Some knowledge of the material is evident, but there are serious deficiencies in understanding, organization, clarity or accuracy. Write-ups that are unduly brief would fall into this category.
Fail In written examination and practical sessions: Poor knowledge and understanding of the subject, a lack of coherent and organization, and answers are largely irrelevant.
Course Type Lecture with laboratory component course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Laboratory 24
Lectures 24
Tutorials 6
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Examination 75 CLO 1,2,3
Laboratory reports 25 CLO 3
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
P. J. Davis: Plant Hormones: Physiology, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 1995, 2nd ed.)
P.J. Davis:  Plant Hormones: Biosynthesis, Signal Transduction, Action! (Springer Netherlands, 2010)
Lecturing materials and journal articles will be posted on HKU Moodle.
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk/
Additional Course Information This course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers.


   <<< This course is not offered in 2018 - 2019. Course details are subject to change. >>>
BIOL3108 Microbial physiology (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 50
Course Co-ordinator Dr A Yan, Biological Sciences < ayan8@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr A Yan,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives Microbes are amazing and important entities on earth. Knowledge of microbes is widely applied in food, pharmaceutics, biotechnologies, diseases control, and biogeochemical processes. Microbial Physiology provides molecular basis for understanding of these important processes and applications, and to serve as essential foundations for sub-disciplines of Microbiology, such as environmental, industrial, and medicinal Microbiology. Upon completion, students will acquire fundamental knowledge and methodologies for microbial studies and be able to relate knowledge to various microbial applications.
Course Contents & Topics Serving as a fundamental course for the understanding of the world of microorganisms, Microbial Physiology is organized and presented in three themes: 'Microbial Rules', 'Microbial Breath', and 'Microbial Adaption'. Under these three themes, a broad range of highly educational and interesting topics are presented including: 'Microorganisms and their position in the living world', 'Fundamental methodologies for the study of microbes', 'Microbial structures and functions', 'Microbial growth and control', 'Energy Generation', 'Central metabolism', and 'Regulation and control of metabolic Activities'. Topics are taught in a coherent manner with a highly interactive tutorial session following each of the topics such that students will achieve a high quality, stimulating, and problem-based learning experiences.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 appreciate the diversity of microbial metabolisms and the strategies for their adaptive responses
CLO 2 comprehend the principles underlying the dynamic nature of microbial physiology
CLO 3 relate knowledge to practical application of microbes in industry and medicine
CLO 4 develop abilities to read and assess scientific literature in microbiology area
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOC2600 or BIOL2103 or BIOC3604
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2U000C00 Course not offered under any Major/Minor/Professional core
2015 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2015 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2014 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 N        To be confirmed Examination To be confirmed
Offer in 2019 - 2020 N
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough mastery at an advanced level of extensive knowledge required for attaining all the course learning outcomes. Show strong analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, with evidence of original thought, and ability to apply knowledge to a wide range of complex, familiar and unfamiliar situations. Apply highly effective organizational skills.
B Demonstrate substantial command of a broad range of knowledge required for attaining at least most of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, and ability to apply knowledge to familiar and some unfamiliar situations. Apply effective organizational skills.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete command of knowledge required for attaining most of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of some analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, and ability to apply knowledge to most familiar situations. Apply moderately effective organizational skills.
D Demonstrate partial but limited command of knowledge required for attaining some of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of some coherent and logical thinking, but with limited analytical and critical abilities. Show limited ability to apply knowledge to solve problems. Apply limited or barely effective organizational skills.
Fail Demonstrate little or no evidence of command of knowledge required for attaining the course learning outcomes. Lack of analytical and critical abilities, logical and coherent thinking. Show very little or no ability to apply knowledge to solve problems. Organizational skills are minimally effective or ineffective.
Course Type Lecture-based course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Lectures 36
Project work 2
Tutorials 12
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments 20 CLO 1,2,3,4
Examination 50 CLO 1,2,3
Test mid-term 30 CLO 1,2,3
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Primary Text Book:
Prescott, Harley, and Klein's Microbiology, by Joanne M. Willey, Linda M. Sherwood, and Christopher J. Woolverton, published by McGraw-Hill
Supplementary Reading:
On-line textbook of Bacteriology: Kenneth Tobar, U. of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Bacteriology. URL (http://www.textbookofbacteriology.net/)
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk/
Additional Course Information This course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers.


BIOL3109 Environmental microbiology (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 40
Course Co-ordinator Dr J D Gu, Biological Sciences < jdgu@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr J D Gu,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives To familarize students with the role of various microorganisms in natural process which affect our environment, such as cycling of chemical elements, interactions with plants and animals, and the way in which they carry out biodegradation of environmentally important pollutants. Selective groups of microorganism will be examined in detail for their biochemical processes. Key concepts are illustrated with known examples and cases
Course Contents & Topics 1. Advanced aspects of microbial diversity, ecology and growth
2. Contribution of microbial metabolism to biogeochemical processes important in cycling of nutrients
3. Microbial interactions with plants and animals
4. Microbial metabolism of organic compounds, metals and man-made polymers
5. Training in laboratory and field microbiological research technique
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 understand a range of microorganisms in the environment in terms of their roles and function as well as biochemical capability and host range
CLO 2 know the specific biochemical processes, enzymes involved and reactions carried by selective microorganisms and their distribution in the environment
CLO 3 apply the appropriate techniques in environmental and microbial research
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOL2103
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2017 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2016 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2015 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2014 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        2nd sem    Examination May     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Thorough mastery at an advanced level of extensive knowledge and skills required for attaining all the course learning outcomes. Thorough grasp of the subject matter. Show very strong analytical and critical abilities and high logical thinking, with evidence of original thought. Apply highly effective lab skills and techniques. Critical use of data and results to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions. Apply highly effective organizational and presentational skills.
B Substantial command of a broad range of knowledge and skills required for attaining at least most of the course learning outcomes. Substantial grasp of the subject. Show evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking. Apply effective lab skills and techniques. Correct use of data of results to draw appropriate conclusions. Apply effective organizational and presentational skills.
C General but incomplete command of knowledge and skills required for attaining most of the course learning outcomes. General but incomplete grasp of the subject. Evidence of some analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking. Apply moderately effective lab skills and techniques. Mostly correct but some erroneous use of data and results to draw appropriate conclusions. Apply moderately effective organizational and presentational skills.
D Partial but limited command of knowledge and skills required for attaining some of the course learning outcomes. Partial but limited grasp, with retention of some relevant information, of the subject. Evidence of some coherent and logical thinking, but with limited analytical and critical abilities. Partially effective lab skills and techniques. Limited ability to use data and results to draw appropriate conclusions. Apply limited or barely effective organizational and presentational skills.
Fail Little or no evidence of command of knowledge and skills required for attaining the course learning outcomes. Evidence of little or no grasp of the knowledge and understanding of the subject. Evidence of little or lack of analytical and critical abilities, logical and coherent thinking. Minimally effective or ineffective lab skills and techniques. Misuse of data and results and/or unable to draw appropriate conclusions. Organization and presentational skills are minimally effective or ineffective.
Course Type Lecture with laboratory component course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Field work 2
Laboratory 24
Lectures 24
Project work 2
Tutorials 4
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments 10 CLO 1,2,3
Examination 50 CLO 1,2,3
Laboratory reports 25 CLO 1,2,3
Presentation including report 10 CLO 1,2,3
Test 5 CLO 1,2,3
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
M.T. Madigan, J. M. Martinko, P.V. Dunlap and D.P. Clark: Brock Biology of Microorganisms (Pearson/Benjamin Cummings, 2009, 12th ed.)
R.M. Atlas and R. Bartha: Microbial Ecology: Fundamentals and Applications (Benjamin Cummings, 1998, 4th ed.)
References
Molecular Biology of the Cell - Fifth Edition by Bruce Alberts, Alexander Johnson,
Julian Lewis, Martin Raff, Keith Roberts, Peter Walter (December 2007)
R. Mitchell and J.-D. Gu: Environmental Microbiology (Wiley-Blackwell, 2009, 2nd ed.)
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk/
Additional Course Information This course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers.


BIOL3110 Environmental toxicology (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 60
Course Co-ordinator Dr J D Gu, Biological Sciences < jdgu@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr J D Gu,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives To introduce students to the basic principles of environmental and ecological toxicology by analysis of the fate of pollutants in lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere. Mechanisms of toxicity as dose-response will be analyzed through adsorption, metabolism, toxicity and elimination. Major metabolic processes and enzymes involved will be highlighted. Specific cases of toxicity will be presented and discussed.
Course Contents & Topics 1. Environmental chemistry of pollutants and their toxicity and factors governing toxic effects, bioaccumulation and biomagnification
2. Partitioning and transformation of environmental pollutants
3. Quantitative toxicology using dose-response approaches
4. Emerging endocrine-disrupting chemicals and carcinogens at molecular levels
5. Elimination of pollutants from the environments
6. Laboratory testing of toxicity and review various adsorption isotherm models
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 understand fate and distribution of chemicals in various compartments of the ecosystem
CLO 2 understand toxicity through adsorption, metabolism, elimination and target site and quantitative analysis
CLO 3 understand mechanism of toxicity from specific pollutants of choice
CLO 4 understand specific biochemical processes and enzymes involved in pollutants transformation and mineralization
CLO 5 understand appropriate techniques in environmental cleaning up
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOL2103 or CHEM3141 or ENVS3042
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Environmental Science < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2017 Major in Environmental Science < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2016 Major in Environmental Science < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2015 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2015 Major in Environmental Science < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2014 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2014 Major in Environmental Science < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        2nd sem    Examination May     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Thorough mastery at an advanced level of extensive knowledge and skills required for attaining all the course learning outcomes. Thorough grasp of the subject matter. Show very strong analytical and critical abilities and high logical thinking, with evidence of original thought. Apply highly effective lab skills and techniques. Critical use of data and results to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions. Apply highly effective organizational and presentational skills.
B Substantial command of a broad range of knowledge and skills required for attaining at least most of the course learning outcomes. Substantial grasp of the subject. Show evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking. Apply effective lab skills and techniques. Correct use of data of results to draw appropriate conclusions. Apply effective organizational and presentational skills.
C General but incomplete command of knowledge and skills required for attaining most of the course learning outcomes. General but incomplete grasp of the subject. Evidence of some analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking. Apply moderately effective lab skills and techniques. Mostly correct but some erroneous use of data and results to draw appropriate conclusions. Apply moderately effective organizational and presentational skills.
D Partial but limited command of knowledge and skills required for attaining some of the course learning outcomes. Partial but limited grasp, with retention of some relevant information, of the subject. Evidence of some coherent and logical thinking, but with limited analytical and critical abilities. Partially effective lab skills and techniques. Limited ability to use data and results to draw appropriate conclusions. Apply limited or barely effective organizational and presentational skills.
Fail Little or no evidence of command of knowledge and skills required for attaining the course learning outcomes. Evidence of little or no grasp of the knowledge and understanding of the subject. Evidence of little or lack of analytical and critical abilities, logical and coherent thinking. Minimally effective or ineffective lab skills and techniques. Misuse of data and results and/or unable to draw appropriate conclusions. Organization and presentational skills are minimally effective or ineffective.
Course Type Lecture with laboratory component course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Laboratory laboratory, assignment; and seminar 36
Lectures 24
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Examination 60 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Laboratory reports student-based assessment includes laboratory report, assignment, presentations or other forms 40 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
D.G. Crosby: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (Oxford, 1998)
W. Stumm, J.J. Morgan: Aquatic Chemistry: Chemical Equlibria and Rates in Natural Waters (Wiley, 1995, 3rd ed.)
R. Mitchell and J.-D. Gu: Environmental Microbiology (Wiley-Blackwell, 2009, 2nd ed.)
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk/
Additional Course Information This course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers.


BIOL3201 Food chemistry (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 70
Course Co-ordinator Dr J C Y Lee, Biological Sciences < jettylee@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr J C Y Lee,School of Biological Sciences)
(TBC,School of Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives To provide a basic understanding of chemistry in food systems, and to provide practical training in chemistry related to food science and nutrition.
Course Contents & Topics The course will cover the components of food, including water, proteins, carbohydrates and lipids, and minor components such as enzymes, vitamins, minerals, colorants, flavorants and additives. The physical and chemical properties of these important constituents of foods are covered in detail, and form the basis for understanding the reactions which occur during the production, processing, storage and handling of foods, and in understanding the methods used in analyzing foods.

A series of laboratory sessions will cover analysis of food components, protein chemistry, lipid oxidation, properties of sugars and starches, enzymatic and non-enzymatic browning reactions, and sensory analysis of foods.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 understand the functions and properties of major and minor food components
CLO 2 understand the basic chemistry behind food processing
CLO 3 have integrated their knowledge of biological and chemical principles into a food science and nutrition context
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOC2600 or BIOL2103 or BIOL2220 or MEDE2301; and NOT for students who have passed in BIOL2101.
This course is only for students admitted in 2016-2017 or before.
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2U000C00 Course not offered under any Major/Minor/Professional core
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2 >
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2 >
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        1st sem    Examination Dec     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough grasp of the subject matter covered. Show extensive knowledge and understanding of the topics covered and can readily apply this knowledge. Critically use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions.
B Demonstrate substantial grasp of the subject matter covered. Show thorough knowledge and understanding of the content and a high level of competence in the topics covered and able to apply this knowledge and skills to most situations. Use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw generally appropriate conclusions.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete grasp of the subject matter covered. The student has a sound knowledge and understanding of the main areas of content and has achieved an adequate level of competence in the topics covered. Use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw moderately appropriate conclusions.
D Demonstrate partial but limited grasp, with retention of some relevant information of the subject matter covered. Show a basic knowledge and understanding of the content and has achieved a limited level of competence in the topics covered. Use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw appropriate conclusions occasionally.
Fail Demonstrate little or no grasp, with retention of little relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Show elementary knowledge and understanding in few areas of the content and has achieved very limited competence in some of the topics covered. Use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results ineffectively, leading generally to inappropriate and usually erroneous conclusions.
Course Type Lecture with laboratory component course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Laboratory 24
Lectures 24
Tutorials 6
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments 30 CLO 1,2,3
Examination 50 CLO 1,2,3
Test 20 CLO 1,2,3
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Fennema OR, Food Chemistry (Marcel Dekker 4th Ed, 2008)
Belitz HD, Grosch W, Schieberle, P, Food Chemistry (Springer 4th Ed, 2009)
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk/
Additional Course Information This course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers


BIOL3202 Nutritional biochemistry (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 100
Course Co-ordinator Dr C B Chan, Biological Sciences < chancb@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr C B Chan,Biological Sciences)
(Dr J C Y Louie,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives To introduce the fundamental concepts of nutrition through  an integrated approach in discussing the interactions between diet and intermediary metabolism.
Course Contents & Topics Essential nutrients and their requirement;
Metabolic control of macronutrient utilization;
Metabolism of micronutrients
Nutritional impacts of hexoses, long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid, cholesterol, amino acids, vitamins and minerals
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 explain how different organs coordinate to achieve metabolic control of glucose
CLO 2 understand the metabolic pathways of cholesterol and polyunsaturated fatty acids
CLO 3 understand the theoretical constructs of nitrogen requirement and the importance of the urea cycle
CLO 4 understand the biochemical roles of micronutrient in human health
CLO 5 explain the biochemical outcomes of nutrient deficiency/excess
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOC2600 or BIOL2220 or MEDE2301
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,4 >
2017 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,4 >
2016 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,4 >
2015 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,4 >
2014 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,4 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        1st sem    Examination Dec     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough grasp of the subject matter covered. Show exceptional ability on knowledge integration, problem identification and solving. Show outstanding ability to critically analyze and interpret scientific data and draw appropriate conclusions. Demonstrate highly effective organization / writing skills.
B Demonstrate substantial grasp of the subject matter covered. Show full ability on knowledge integration, problem identification and solving. Show reasonable ability to critically analyze and interpret scientific data and draw appropriate conclusions. Demonstrate effective organization / writing skills.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete grasp of the subject matter covered. Might show misunderstanding of the materials. Show some ability on knowledge integration, problem identification and solving. Show some ability to analyze and interpret scientific data and draw proper conclusions. Demonstrate adequate organization / writing skills.
D Demonstrate partial but limited grasp, with retention of some relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Misunderstanding of the materials is not uncommon. Show limited ability on knowledge integration, problem identification and solving. Use elementary approaches to analyze and interpret scientific data and draw sometimes erroneous conclusions. Demonstrate basic organization / writing skills.
Fail Demonstrate little or no grasp, with retention of little relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Show lack of coherent and logical thinking, and minimal competence in problem solving. Fail to integrate information and identify problems. Seriously deficient in ability to analyze and interpret scientific data and draw conclusions. Demonstrate poor organization / writing skills.
Course Type Lecture-based course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Lectures 36
Tutorials 12
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Examination 60 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Test 40 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Gropper S.S. & Smith J. L. Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism. Cengage Learning, 2016
Frayn K.N. Metabolic regulation: A Human Perspective. Wiley-Blackwell, 2010
Champe P.C., Harvey R.A. & Ferrier D.R. Lippincott's Illustrated Reviews: Biochemistry. Lippincott, 2008
Gibney M.J., Macdonald I.A. & Roche H.M. Nutrition & Metabolism. Blackwell Science, 2003
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk/
Additional Course Information This course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers


BIOL3203 Food microbiology (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 80
Course Co-ordinator Dr H S El-Nezami, Biological Sciences < elnezami@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr H S El-Nezami,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives This course provides the key concepts and principles of food microbiology with special emphasis on the interaction between microorganisms and food., microbial food spoilage and foodborne diseases will be discussed in detail.
Course Contents & Topics Detection and enumeration of microbes in foods, Factors that influence microbes in foods, Spores and their significance, Physical methods of food preservation, Chemical preservation and natural antimicrobials, Foodborne pathogens.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 describe methods for evaluating microorganisms and their products in foods
CLO 2 demonstrate an understanding of the causes of food spoilage, and predict response of a microorganism that can spoil a given food
CLO 3 develop and implement appropriate measures to control the spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms in a food
CLO 4 demonstrate the ability to work in a team to investigate and solve problems in food microbiology
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOC2600 or BIOL2220 or MEDE2301
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,4 >
2017 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,4 >
2016 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,4 >
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,4 >
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,4 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        2nd sem    Examination May     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough grasp of the subject matter covered. Show strong analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, with evidence of creative ability and competence in professional-level problem solving. Critically use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate highly effective team-based organizational and presentational skills.
B Demonstrate substantial grasp of the subject matter covered. Show evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking with some evidence of competence in professional-level problem solving. Use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw generally appropriate conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate effective team-based organizational and presentational skills.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete grasp of the subject matter covered. Show some evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking with limited competence in professional-level problem solving. Use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw moderately appropriate but sometimes erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate moderately effective team-based organizational and presentational skills.
D Demonstrate partial but limited grasp, with retention of some relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Show some evidence of coherent and logical thinking, but lacking competence in professional-level problem solving. Use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw sometimes appropriate but often erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate team-based organizational and presentational skills of limited effectiveness.
Fail Demonstrate little or no grasp, with retention of little relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Show lack of coherent and logical thinking, and minimal competence in professional-level problem solving. Use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results ineffectively, leading generally to inappropriate and usually erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate ineffectiveness team-based organizational and presentational skills.
Course Type Lecture with laboratory component course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Laboratory 24
Lectures 24
Tutorials 12
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments seminars & continuous assessment 40 CLO 2,4
Examination 40 CLO 1,2
Laboratory reports 20 CLO 1,3
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Food Microbiology: An Introduction, 2005, Thomas J. Montville and Karl Matthews, American Society for Microbiology (ASM) Press, Washington, DC
Food Microbiology: Fundamentals and Frontiers, 2007, Edited by Michael P. Doyle, Larry R. Beuchat, and Thomas J. Montville, 3rd edition, American Society for Microbiology (ASM) Press, Washington, DC
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk/
Additional Course Information This course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers


BIOL3204 Nutrition and the life cycle (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 70
Course Co-ordinator Dr J C Y Louie, Biological Sciences < jimmyl@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr J C Y Louie,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives Nutritional needs vary throughout different stages of the life cycle. This course aims to cover the functional roles of essential macro- and micro-nutrients and highlight the nutritional concerns during specific times of growth, development, and aging.
Course Contents & Topics Teaching and learning will take place through an evidence-based approach and will be organized around key issues: needs of macro- and micronutrients, as well as the physiological and psychological determinants that influence nutrient requirements at different stages of the human life cycle. Socio-economic factors that influence dietary habit and nutritional status will also be covered.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 be able to critically assess and identify the specific needs at different stages of the life cycle
CLO 2 relate the concept of requirement to physiological needs
CLO 3 understand the impact of socio-cultural factors on nutritional status
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOL3202
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4 >
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4 >
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4 >
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4 >
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        2nd sem    Examination May     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough grasp of the subject matter covered. Show exceptional ability on knowledge integration, problem identification and solving. Show outstanding ability to critically analyze and interpret scientific data and draw appropriate conclusions. Demonstrate highly effective team-based organization and presentation skills.
B Demonstrate substantial grasp of the subject matter covered. Show full ability on knowledge integration, problem identification and solving. Show reasonable ability to critically analyze and interpret scientific data and draw appropriate conclusions. Demonstrate effective team-based organization and presentation skills.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete grasp of the subject matter covered. Might show misunderstanding of the materials. Show some ability on knowledge integration, problem identification and solving. Show some ability to analyze and interpret scientific data and draw proper conclusions. Demonstrate adequately effective team-based organization and presentation skills.
D Demonstrate partial but limited grasp, with retention of some relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Misunderstanding of the materials is not uncommon. Show limited ability on knowledge integration, problem identification and solving. Use elementary approaches to analyze and interpret scientific data and draw sometimes erroneous conclusions. Demonstrate team-based organization and presentation skills of limited effectiveness.
Fail Demonstrate little or no grasp, with retention of little relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Show lack of coherent and logical thinking, and minimal competence in problem solving. Fail to integrate information and identify problems. Seriously deficient in ability to analyze and interpret scientific data and draw conclusions. Demonstrate poor organization and presentation skills.
Course Type Lecture-based course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Lectures 36
Tutorials student-centered learning 12
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments Group project 20 CLO 1,2
Essay Critical appraisal 20 CLO 1,2,3
Examination 60 CLO 1,2,3
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Brown J.E. Nutrition Through the Life Cycle. Thomson, 2011
Gropper S.S., Smith J.L.. & Groff J.L. Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism (Wadsworth, 2009)
Croxford, Itsiopoulous, Forsyth, Belski, Thodis, Shepherd and Tierney. Food & Nutrition Throughout Life (2015)
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk/
Additional Course Information This course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers.


BIOL3205 Human physiology (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 120
Course Co-ordinator Dr W Y Lui, Biological Sciences < wylui@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr C B Chan,Biological Sciences)
(Dr W Y Lui,Biological Sciences)
(Prof A O L Wong,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives The course covers major aspects of the physiology of the human body using an integrated approach. After completing this course, students will have acquired fundamental principles of how the body works. Students interested in nutrition and human biology will find this course most useful.
Course Contents & Topics Overview of the physiological systems and homeostasis; Neural and hormonal communication; Nervous system physiology; The digestive system; Cardiac physiology, the blood vessels and blood pressure; The respiratory system; The urinary system; The skeletal & muscular system; Sensory mechanisms; Biological rhythms; Central-peripheral communication in energy homeostasis.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 comprehend the essence of how the body meets changing conditions while maintaining a relatively constant internal environment
CLO 2 understand the functions of various body systems
CLO 3 explain normal body functions through integration of basic physiologic concepts
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOC2600 or BIOL2103 or BIOL2220 or MEDE2301
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology (Intensive) ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1 >
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology (Intensive) < PLO 1,3,4 >
2017 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1 >
2016 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1 >
2015 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1 >
2014 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        1st sem    Examination Dec     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough mastery at an advanced level of extensive knowledge required for attaining all the course learning outcomes. Show strong analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, with evidence of original thought, and ability to apply knowledge to a wide range of complex, familiar and unfamiliar situations. Apply highly effective organizational skills.
B Demonstrate substantial command of a broad range of knowledge required for attaining at least most of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, and ability to apply knowledge to familiar and some unfamiliar situations. Apply effective organizational skills.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete command of knowledge required for attaining most of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of some analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, and ability to apply knowledge to most familiar situations. Apply moderately effective organizational skills.
D Demonstrate partial but limited command of knowledge required for attaining some of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of some coherent and logical thinking, but with limited analytical and critical abilities. Show limited ability to apply knowledge to solve problems. Apply limited or barely effective organizational skills.
Fail Demonstrate little or no evidence of command of knowledge required for attaining the course learning outcomes. Lack of analytical and critical abilities, logical and coherent thinking. Show very little or no ability to apply knowledge to solve problems. Organizational skills are minimally effective or ineffective.
Course Type Lecture-based course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Lectures 36
Tutorials 12
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Examination 70 CLO 1,2,3
Test 30 CLO 1,2,3
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Silverthorn D. U.: Human Physiology: An integrated Approach (Pearson, 2008)
Sherwood L.: Human Physiology: From Cells to Systems (Thomson, 2007)
Johnson M. D.: Human Biology (Pearson, 2006)
Siegel G. J. et al.: Basic Neurochemistry (Academic Press, 2006)
Mulroney S.E. & Myers A.K. Netter's Essential Physiology (Saunders, 2009)
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk/
Additional Course Information This course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers.


BIOL3206 Clinical nutrition (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 70
Course Co-ordinator Dr J M F Wan, Biological Sciences < jmfwan@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr J M F Wan,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives This course aims to provide understanding and insight into diseases associated with diet and basic dietetics, specifically to:

1. Explain the relationships between diet and disease.
2. Describe the role of diet in the development and prevention of common chronic diseases such as diabetes, obesity and anorexia, cardiovascular disease, cancer, immune deficiency and renal failure.
3. Differentiate risk factors that influence dietary choice.
4.  Describe the rationales for postoperative nutritional support for hospitalized patients.
Course Contents & Topics The basics of nutrition for health and fitness and medical nutrition therapy. The role of diet in the development and prevention of chronic diseases such as cancer, diabetes, obesity and anorexia as well as bulimia nervosa, cardiovascular diseases, renal failure, etc. Malnutrition. Nutrition and immune function. Medical nutrition therapy for food allergy and food intolerance. Nutrition in pregnancy and lactation.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 discuss the different relationships between diet and disease
CLO 2 describe the role of diet in the development and prevention of diabetes, obesity and anorexia, cardiovascular disease, cancer, immune deficiency, and renal failure
CLO 3 clearly differentiate and interpret risk factors that influence dietary choice
CLO 4 describe the rationales for postoperative nutritional support for hospitalized patients
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOL3202 or BIOL3203 or BIOL3204 or BIOL3205
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4,6 >
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4,6 >
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4,6 >
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4,6 >
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4,6 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        2nd sem    Examination May     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough mastery at an advanced level of extensive knowledge and skills required for attaining all the course learning outcomes. Thorough grasp of the subject. Show strong analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, with evidence of original thought, and ability to apply knowledge to a wide range of complex, familiar and unfamiliar situations. Apply highly effective organizational and presentational skills. Apply highly effective laboratory/fieldwork skills and techniques. Critical use of data and results to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions. Apply highly effective organizational and presentational skills.
B Demonstrate substantial command of a broad range of knowledge and skills required for attaining at least most of the course learning outcomes. Substantial grasp of the subject. Show evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, and ability to apply knowledge to familiar and some unfamiliar situations. Apply effective organizational and presentational skills. Apply effective laboratory /fieldwork skills and techniques. Correct use of data of results to draw appropriate conclusions. Apply effective organizational and presentational skills.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete command of knowledge and skills required for attaining most of the course learning outcomes. General but incomplete grasp of the subject. Show evidence of some analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, and ability to apply knowledge to most familiar situations. Apply moderately effective organizational and presentational skills. Apply moderately effective laboratory / fieldwork skills and techniques. Mostly correct but some erroneous use of data and results to draw appropriate conclusions. Apply moderately effective organizational and presentational skills.
D Demonstrate partial but limited command of knowledge and skills required for attaining some of the course learning outcomes. Partial but limited grasp of the subject, retention of some relevant information of the subject. Show evidence of some coherent and logical thinking, but with limited analytical and critical abilities. Show limited ability to apply knowledge to solve problems. Apply limited or barely effective organizational and presentational skills. Apply partially effective lab / fieldwork skills and techniques. Limited ability to use data and results to draw appropriate conclusions. Apply limited or barely effective organizational and presentational skills.
Fail Demonstrate little or no evidence of command of knowledge and skills required for attaining the course learning outcomes. Little or no grasp of the knowledge and understanding of the subject. Lack of analytical and critical abilities, logical and coherent thinking. Show very little or no ability to apply knowledge to solve problems. Organization and presentational skills are minimally effective or ineffective. Apply minimally effective or ineffective laboratory / fieldwork skills and techniques. Misuse of data and results and/or unable to draw appropriate conclusions. Organization and presentational skills are minimally effective or ineffective.
Course Type Lecture-based course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Lectures 36
Tutorials 12
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments 20 CLO 1,2
Examination 60 CLO 1,2,3,4
Presentation 20 CLO 1,2,3,4
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Selected readings will also be available on the class website.
S. Rodwell Williams: Nutrition and Diet Therapy (7th ed.) Suitor & Hunter: Nutrition: Principles and Application in Health Promotion Wardlaw Gordon: Perspectives in Nutrition (2nd ed.)
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk/
Additional Course Information This course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers.


BIOL3207 Food and nutritional toxicology (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 80
Course Co-ordinator Dr H S El-Nezami, Biological Sciences < elnezami@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr H S El-Nezami,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives To introduce students to methods used in assessing the toxicity of food contaminants, and to develop their confidence in the handling and interpretation of toxicological data. Students will also be introduced to the basic concepts behind toxicological evaluation, and the criteria for setting guidance values for dietary and nondietary exposure to chemicals. Students will understand the role of biochemical, metabolic and toxicokinetic studies in toxicological evaluation. This course aims to equip students with basic skills in conducting food toxicological studies.
Course Contents & Topics Topics include a discussion on exposure and entry routes, fates of toxic substances in the body (toxicokinetics), concepts in experimental toxicology, the dose response relationship, actions of toxic substances, target organ effects, the actions and types of carcinogens. A survey of the health effects of common classes of toxic substances is also presented.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 demonstrate an understanding of the processes involved in absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of toxicants, including an understanding of the toxicokinetic behavior of toxicants in mammals
CLO 2 demonstrate an understanding of the various effects induced after exposure to toxicants
CLO 3 demonstrate an understanding of the factors which underlie species differences in response to potential toxicants
CLO 4 demonstrate the ability to work in a team to investigate and solve toxicological problems of importance in human health
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOC2600 or BIOL2220 or BIOL3205 or MEDE2301
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4 >
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4 >
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4 >
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4 >
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        2nd sem    Examination May     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough grasp of the subject matter covered. Show strong analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, with evidence of creative ability and competence in professional-level problem solving. Critically use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate highly effective team-based organizational and presentational skills.
B Demonstrate substantial grasp of the subject matter covered. Show evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking with some evidence of competence in professional-level problem solving. Use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw generally appropriate conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate effective team-based organizational and presentational skills.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete grasp of the subject matter covered. Show some evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking with limited competence in professional-level problem solving. Use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw moderately appropriate but sometimes erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate moderately effective team-based organizational and presentational skills.
D Demonstrate partial but limited grasp, with retention of some relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Show some evidence of coherent and logical thinking, but lacking competence in professional-level problem solving. Use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw sometimes appropriate but often erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate team-based organizational and presentational skills of limited effectiveness.
Fail Demonstrate little or no grasp, with retention of little relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Show lack of coherent and logical thinking, and minimal competence in professional-level problem solving. Use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results ineffectively, leading generally to inappropriate and usually erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate ineffectiveness team-based organizational and presentational skills.
Course Type Lecture with laboratory component course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Laboratory 24
Lectures 24
Tutorials 12
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments seminars & continuous assessment 40 CLO 2,4
Examination 40 CLO 1,2,3
Laboratory reports 20 CLO 2
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
S. S. Deshpande: Handbook of Food Toxicology (Marcel Dekker Inc., NY, 2002)
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk/
Additional Course Information This course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers.


   <<< This course is not offered in 2018 - 2019. Course details are subject to change. >>>
BIOL3208 Food safety and quality management (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 45
Course Co-ordinator Dr O Habimana, Biological Sciences < ohabim@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved
Course Objectives To provide exposure to some key management concepts used to produce safe high-quality food products that will succeed in the marketplace.  To introduce students to analysis and problem-solving of realistic business situations in food safety management.
Course Contents & Topics - The regulatory, social and business imperative for food safety.
- Basic concepts in TQM
- Statistical Process Control
- Quality Function Deployment
- Quality management standards (ISO 9000)
- Development and implementation of a Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) plan (within an ISO 22000 food safety management system/ supply chain approach)
- Role of environmental management systems (ISO 14000) in the food industry
- Intellectual Property issues in the food industry
- Religious, ethical, and cultural food choices
- Illustrative business case studies on food safety management will be discussed
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 understand the historical development of government regulation of food safety
CLO 2 be familiar with a set of management techniques applicable in the food industry
CLO 3 be able to analyze food production problems and make recommendations for action to improve quality and safety
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOL3201 or BIOL3203
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2U000C00 Course not offered under any Major/Minor/Professional core
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4,6 >
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4,6 >
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4,6 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 N        To be confirmed Examination To be confirmed
Offer in 2019 - 2020 N
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough grasp of the subject matter covered. Show strong analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, with evidence of creative ability and competence in professional-level problem solving. Critically use quality management skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate highly effective team-based organizational and presentational skills.
B Demonstrate substantial grasp of the subject matter covered. Show evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking with some evidence of competence in professional-level problem solving. Use quality management skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw generally appropriate conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate effective team-based organizational and presentational skills.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete grasp of the subject matter covered. Show some evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking with limited competence in professional-level problem solving. Use quality management skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw moderately appropriate but sometimes erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate moderately effective team-based organizational and presentational skills.
D Demonstrate partial but limited grasp, with retention of some relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Show some evidence of coherent and logical thinking, but lacking competence in professional-level problem solving. Use quality management skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw sometimes appropriate but often erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate team-based organizational and presentational skills of limited effectiveness.
Fail Demonstrate little or no grasp, with retention of little relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Show lack of coherent and logical thinking, and minimal competence in professional-level problem solving. Use quality management skills and techniques and analysis of data and results ineffectively, leading generally to inappropriate and usually erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate ineffectiveness team-based organizational and presentational skills.
Course Type Lecture-based course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Group work 30
Lectures 36
Tutorials including presentation 12
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments 10 CLO 2
Examination 60 CLO 1,2,3
Project reports including presentation 30 CLO 2,3
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Jones, J. M.: Food Safety (Eagan Press, 1992)
Mortimore, S. and Wallace, C.: HACCP: A Practical Approach (Chapman and Hall, 1994)
Forsythe, S. J.: The Microbiology of Safe Food (2nd Ed., Wiley-Blackwell, 2010)
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk/
Additional Course Information This course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers.


BIOL3209 Food and nutrient analysis (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 70
Course Co-ordinator Dr J C Y Lee, Biological Sciences < jettylee@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr J C Y Lee,Biological Sciences)
(Dr M F Wang,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives To introduce basic principles and provide practical training in food and nutrient analysis. To help students to understand the principles behind analytical instruments used in food analysis.  To train students to analyze major and minor food components as well as some food adulterants.
Course Contents & Topics The key concepts in professional food analysis in an industry context will be introduced. Basic analytical techniques for macronutrients (e.g. protein, carbohydrate and fats), micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) and adulterants in food will be covered. A variety of classical and instrumental techniques used in food analysis will be discussed: rheology and texture measurement, thermal analysis, color, spectroscopy, chromatography and electrophoresis.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 understand the basic principles of food and nutrient analysis
CLO 2 be familiar with a variety of classical and instrumental analytical techniques
CLO 3 understand the principles behind analytical instruments associated with food
CLO 4 be able apply their knowledge and laboratory skills in novel situations to measure and analyze the macronutrient and micronutrient of food products
CLO 5 be able to select and justify an appropriate analytical technique to solve practical food analysis problems
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOL2101 or BIOL3201
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        1st sem    Examination Dec     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough grasp of the subject matter covered. Show strong analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, with evidence of creative ability and competence in professional-level problem solving. Critically use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate highly effective team-based organizational and presentational skills.
B Demonstrate substantial grasp of the subject matter covered. Show evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking with some evidence of competence in professional-level problem solving. Use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw generally appropriate conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate effective team-based organizational and presentational skills.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete grasp of the subject matter covered. Show some evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking with limited competence in professional-level problem solving. Use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw moderately appropriate but sometimes erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate moderately effective team-based organizational and presentational skills.
D Demonstrate partial but limited grasp, with retention of some relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Show some evidence of coherent and logical thinking, but lacking competence in professional-level problem solving. Use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw sometimes appropriate but often erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate team-based organizational and presentational skills of limited effectiveness.
Fail Demonstrate little or no grasp, with retention of little relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Show lack of coherent and logical thinking, and minimal competence in professional-level problem solving. Use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results ineffectively, leading generally to inappropriate and usually erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate ineffectiveness team-based organizational and presentational skills.
Course Type Lecture with laboratory component course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Laboratory 24
Lectures 24
Tutorials 6
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments practical work & assignment 30 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Examination 70 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Y. Pomeranz and C.E. Meloan: Food Analysis: Theory and Practice (Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1994, 3rd ed.)
S. S. Nielsen: Introduction to the Chemical Analysis of Foods (Jones & Barlett, 2000, 2nd ed.)
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk/
Additional Course Information This course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers.


   <<< This course is not offered in 2018 - 2019. Course details are subject to change. >>>
BIOL3210 Grain production and utilization (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 40
Course Co-ordinator Prof H Corke, Biological Sciences < harold@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved
Course Objectives To provide a broad understanding of the utilization and significance of the major grains in the food industry and in human health and nutrition.
Course Contents & Topics - Global grain production and consumption
- The Green Revolution and its aftermath
- International grain trade
- Wheat: flour milling, dough rheology, the baking process, baking quality
- Wheat: quality of Asian products including steamed bread and noodles
- Wheat: small-scale tests for quality
- Rice: nutritional quality, consumer preferences, milling, quality, quality testing, products
- Maize: products of wet milling, animal feed development
- Biofuels focusing on bioethanol
- Illustrative business case studies on the grain processing industry will be discussed
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 understand the major production, import, and export patterns that support the global utilization of grain
CLO 2 understand the technology behind the production of grain-based foods
CLO 3 understand the scope and nature of professional level quality testing for grain products
CLO 4 appreciate the constraints to global food sufficiency
CLO 5 appreciate the ethical issues behind the diversion of grain into meat and biofuel production
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in any level 2 BIOL course
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2U000C00 Course not offered under any Major/Minor/Professional core
2018 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4,5 >
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4,5 >
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4,5 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 N        To be confirmed Examination To be confirmed
Offer in 2019 - 2020 N
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough grasp of the subject matter covered. Show strong analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, with evidence of creative ability and competence in professional-level problem solving. Critically use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate highly effective team-based organizational and presentational skills.
B Demonstrate substantial grasp of the subject matter covered. Show evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking with some evidence of competence in professional-level problem solving. Use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw generally appropriate conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate effective team-based organizational and presentational skills.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete grasp of the subject matter covered. Show some evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking with limited competence in professional-level problem solving. Use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw moderately appropriate but sometimes erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate moderately effective team-based organizational and presentational skills.
D Demonstrate partial but limited grasp, with retention of some relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Show some evidence of coherent and logical thinking, but lacking competence in professional-level problem solving. Use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw sometimes appropriate but often erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate team-based organizational and presentational skills of limited effectiveness.
Fail Demonstrate little or no grasp, with retention of little relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Show lack of coherent and logical thinking, and minimal competence in professional-level problem solving. Use lab skills and techniques and analysis of data and results ineffectively, leading generally to inappropriate and usually erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate ineffectiveness team-based organizational and presentational skills.
Course Type Lecture-based course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Lectures 36
Tutorials 12
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Examination 70 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Project reports including presentation 30 CLO 2,3
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Encyclopedia of Grain Science, edited by Wrigley CW, Corke H, and Walker CE (2004) 3 Volumes, 1,700 pages. Elsevier, Oxford. (selected chapters only)
Other readings to be provided
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk/
Additional Course Information This course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers.


BIOL3211 Nutrigenomics (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 40
Course Co-ordinator Dr K C Tan-Un, Biological Sciences < kctanun@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr K C Tan-Un,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives Recent advances in the understanding of the human genome have resulted in the emergence of a new science called Nutrigenomics. This course aims to provide students with an understanding of the biochemical mechanisms underpinning the science of nutrition and the relation between genes and diet-related diseases. It explains the role of nutrition at the molecular level and the concepts of nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics.
Course Contents & Topics Concepts of nutrigenomics, nutrigenetics, metabolomics and nutritional biochemistry.
Regulation of gene expression; Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and relation to diseases.
Overview of lipid metabolism; cholesterol metabolic pathway; hyperlipidaemia, LDL receptor mutations.
Relevance of  folate, vitamin B12; hyperhomocysteinemia and gene polymorphisms in diseases.
Epigenetics, Barker s hypothesis, influence of maternal nutrition in fetal gene expression. Obesity, genetic predisposition, candidate genes like leptin, FTO and other hormones involved in the control of appetite
Polyunsaturated fatty acid and their roles in the control of gene expression example lipogenesis and lipid oxidation pathways;
Inborn errors of metabolism in the context of genetic mutations and personalized diet therapy
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 explain the principles of the control of gene expression
CLO 2 demonstrate understanding of the role of metabolic pathways in relationship to diet, gene expression and disease
CLO 3 discuss how genetic variations are used to study the role of genes in nutrient-related cellular processes
CLO 4 explain the relationship between genotype, epigenetics and diet-related diseases
CLO 5 critically evaluate current theories of personalized nutrition based on individual genetic variation
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOC2600 or BIOL2220 or MEDE2301
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        1st sem    Examination Dec     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough grasp of the subject matter covered. Show extensive ability of knowledge integration and problem solving skills. Show excellent ability to critically analyze and interpret complex scientific data and draw appropriate conclusions. Demonstrate highly effective organization and writing skills.
B Demonstrate substantial grasp of the subject matter covered. Show substantial ability of knowledge integration and problem solving skills. Show substantial ability to critically analyze and interpret scientific data and draw appropriate conclusions. Demonstrate effective organization and writing skills.
C Demonstrate general and acceptable grasp of the subject matter covered. Show acceptable ability of knowledge integration and problem solving skills. Show moderate ability to analyze and interpret scientific data and draw proper conclusions. Demonstrate moderate organization and writing skills.
D Demonstrate marginal grasp of the subject matter covered. Show limited ability on knowledge integration and problem solving skills. Show limited ability to analyse and interpret scientific data. Demonstrate basic organization and writing skills.
Fail Demonstrate little or no grasp, with little retention of information of the subject matter covered. Show lack of coherent and logical thinking, and minimal evidence in problem solving. Fail to integrate information and identify problems. Show little or minimal ability to analyze and interpret scientific data and draw conclusions. Demonstrate poor organization and writing skills.
Course Type Lecture-based course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Lectures 36
Tutorials student-centered learning 12
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments 20 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Examination 60 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Test 20 CLO 1
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry
Ordovas: Nutrigenetics and Nutrigenomics. Wiley. 2004
Brigelius-Flohe, Joost: Nutritional Genomics. Wiley. 2006.
Rimbach, Fuchs, Packer: Nutrigenomics, CRC Press. 2005
Journals in Nutrition, Molecular Biology and Genetics
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk/
Additional Course Information This course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers.


BIOL3215 Principles of dietary assessment (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 30
Course Co-ordinator Dr J C Y Louie, Biological Sciences < jimmyl@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr J C Y Louie,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives This course examines the various methods used to measure dietary intake in populations and healthy individuals, how to assess these measurements against international standards, and how to make recommendations for improvement.
Course Contents & Topics Topics covered will include the validity and reliability of different methods, estimations of energy requirements, the use of food composition databases, nutrition screening tools and the planning and use of national surveys for monitoring and evaluation. Students will conduct project work and produce and present professional-level reports using dietary assessment tools.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 understand the principles of dietary assessment methods, and the strengths of limitations of these methods
CLO 2 evaluate the validity and reliability of dietary assessment tools
CLO 3 choose the most appropriate nutrition assessment methods for different purposes
CLO 4 explain the meaning and uses of Dietary Reference Intakes
CLO 5 competently use dietary assessment software with local and international nutrient databases to assess individual dietary intake
CLO 6 interpret foods and diets in terms of nutritional quality and nutrient adequacy, and make appropriate recommendation(s) for improvement, in both product development and dietary review contexts
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOL2102
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4,6 >
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4,6 >
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4,6 >
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4,6 >
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4,6 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        1st sem    Examination No Exam     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough grasp of the subject matter covered. Show strong analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, with evidence of creative ability and competence in professional-level problem solving. Critically use practical skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate highly effective team-based organizational and presentational skills.
B Demonstrate substantial grasp of the subject matter covered. Show evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking with some evidence of competence in professional-level problem solving. Use practical skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw generally appropriate conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate effective team-based organizational and presentational skills.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete grasp of the subject matter covered. Show some evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking with limited competence in professional-level problem solving. Use practical skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw moderately appropriate but sometimes erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate moderately effective team-based organizational and presentational skills.
D Demonstrate partial but limited grasp, with retention of some relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Show some evidence of coherent and logical thinking, but lacking competence in professional-level problem solving. Use practical skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw sometimes appropriate but often erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate team-based organizational and presentational skills of limited effectiveness.
Fail Demonstrate little or no grasp, with retention of little relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Show lack of coherent and logical thinking, and minimal competence in professional-level problem solving. Use practical skills and techniques and analysis of data and results ineffectively, leading generally to inappropriate and usually erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate ineffectiveness team-based organizational and presentational skills.
Course Type Laboratory and workshop course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Tutorials 12
Workshops 48
Reading / Self study 90
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Laboratory reports 40 CLO 1,3,4,5
Presentation Group presentation 10 CLO 1,3,4,5,6
Project reports 30 CLO 1,3,4,5,6
Test 20 CLO 1,2,3,4,5,6
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Required:
Lee RD and Nieman DC, Nutritional Assessment 6th Ed. McGraw Hill
Gibson RS, Principles of Nutritional Assessment 2nd Ed. Oxford University Press
Online materials:
Institute of Medicine (US) Food and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes: A Risk Assessment Model for Establishing Upper Intake Levels for Nutrients. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK45182/
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk
Additional Course Information This course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers


BIOL3216 Food waste management (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 30
Course Co-ordinator Dr O Habimana, Biological Sciences < ohabim@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr O Habimana,School of Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives To allow students to develop an understanding of the propagation, treatment and disposal of food waste relevant within the farm to table chain. To allow students to critically evaluate food waste management and resource recovery potential in Hong Kong in comparison to other countries in Asia/Worldwide.
Course Contents & Topics With our current global population estimated to reach 9.1 billion in 2050, food production will be expected to increase by 70% to meet food demand. However, our current world food supply is instead declining, with 1/4 to 1/3 of all food produced for human consumption lost or wasted. This amounts to a staggering 1 to 2 billion metric tons per year! Clearly we should be worried about food wastage.
In this course, the social, economic, and environmental implications associated with food waste will be identified, by presenting relevant facts and figures and case studies embodying agricultural, industrial and consumer waste-types. Basic waste management concepts will also be covered, examining current waste management in Hong Kong compared to other countries in Asia, while providing the basis for examining our own personal waste footprint. This course will address current applications and limitations of food waste treatment technologies.
Course outline:
-Background, Definitions, Social & Environmental implications of food waste
-Facts and figures related to food Waste
-Basic Waste Management concepts (3 R's)
-Case studies: Agricultural waste
-Case studies: Food Industrial waste
-Case studies: Food consumer waste
-Waste Management in Hong Kong vs other countries in Asia
-Individual waste footprint:  from awareness to legislation in Hong Kong
-Current Technological applications & limitations in food waste treatment
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 understand and define the various types of waste as well as create an awareness of individual waste footprint.
CLO 2 be able to define the 3 R¡¦s in waste management (reduce, reuse, recycle), and be familiarized with waste polices in Hong Kong compared to other countries in Asia /Worldwide.
CLO 3 be able to describe current and novel technologies for treating waste, as well as transforming waste into value added resources.
CLO 4 to develop written and oral presentation skills necessary to effectively convey technical, economic, and social information related to waste management.
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOL2101 or BIOL3201
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        2nd sem    Examination May     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough grasp of the subject matter covered. Show strong analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, with evidence of creative ability and competence in professional-level problem solving. Critically use quality management skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate highly effective team-based organizational and presentational skills.
B Demonstrate substantial grasp of the subject matter covered. Show evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking with some evidence of competence in professional-level problem solving. Use quality management skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw generally appropriate conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate effective team-based organizational and presentational skills.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete grasp of the subject matter covered. Show some evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking with limited competence in professional-level problem solving. Use quality management skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw moderately appropriate but sometimes erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate moderately effective team-based organizational and presentational skills.
D Demonstrate partial but limited grasp, with retention of some relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Show some evidence of coherent and logical thinking, but lacking competence in professional-level problem solving. Use quality management skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw sometimes appropriate but often erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate team-based organizational and presentational skills of limited effectiveness.
Fail Demonstrate little or no grasp, with retention of little relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Show lack of coherent and logical thinking, and minimal competence in professional-level problem solving. Use quality management skills and techniques and analysis of data and results ineffectively, leading generally to inappropriate and usually erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate ineffectiveness team-based organizational and presentational skills.
Course Type Lecture-based course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Group work 30
Lectures 36
Tutorials including presentation 12
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments 10 CLO 1,2,3
Examination 60 CLO 1,2,3,4
Project reports including presentation 30 CLO 2,3,4
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk
Additional Course Information This course will be offered subject to a minimum enrolment number and availability of teachers.


BIOL3217 Food, environment and health (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 50
Course Co-ordinator Dr T. Sobko, Biological Sciences < tsobko@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr T Sobko,School of Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives A cross-disciplinary exploration of the environmental, socio-economic, public health and personal nutrition contexts of food systems. To focus on how our food choices influence the environment and how the environment impacts our diet. To examine the interactions among environment (e.g. pollution, soil and water quality, climate change), food resources (growth, production, consumption, processing, distribution and disposal) and health.
Course Contents & Topics The environment, human well-being and the functioning of society are highly influenced by food production and consumption. Are we destroying the environment as we struggle to feed growing populations? Is the environment becoming increasingly toxic for our health? The course will consist of three blocks: 1) The influence of food consumption on the environment; 2) The impact of environment on food and human health, and 3) What actions can improve these interactions, through evidence-based case examples. A Problem Based Learning (PBL) approach will be used with emphasis on 'real-life' cases connecting human nutrition, well-being and environmental health. Topics will include impacts of certain dietary habits and demands on food systems (e.g. demand for cheap sources of calories, rise of meat consumption, demand for year-round luxury foods) and the depletion of soil and increased fertilizers' use. We will consider how toxins, known as xenobiotics, affect human health and how sensory decisions are influenced by the environment. The holistic approach used will help the students to navigate complex environmental and food-related decisions and expressions, both public and private. Students will learn to critically evaluate the sociocultural, socio-behavioural, ethical and economic aspects of food and environment and understand the importance of biologically sustainable food production and high quality food being a just model for a healthy individual, environment and overall society.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 To understand multifactorial and interdisciplinary relations in sustainable environment and nutrition
CLO 2 To address today¡¦s national and global challenges in the environmental and food sectors
CLO 3 To understand historical and current aspects (agricultural production, policy initiatives) locally, in Asia and worldwide
CLO 4 To address and analyze food/environment issues including food production, consumption, and the fulfilment of the right to adequate food; strengths and weaknesses of political, social, and economic policies and other interventions
CLO 5 To demonstrate skills to become effective environmental educators to communicate the issues of food and environment to a variety of audiences and to apply theoretical knowledge while designing an applicable intervention in public setting
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOL 2101 or ENVS2001 or ENVS2002 or BIOL3201
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4,5,6 >
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4,5,6 >
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4,5,6 >
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4,5,6 >
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 2,3,4,5,6 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        2nd sem    Examination No Exam     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough grasp of the subject matter covered. Show strong analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, with evidence of creative ability and competence in professional-level problem solving. Critically use quality management skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate highly effective team-based organizational and presentational skills.
B Demonstrate substantial grasp of the subject matter covered. Show evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking with some evidence of competence in professional-level problem solving. Use quality management skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw generally appropriate conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate effective team-based organizational and presentational skills
C Demonstrate general but incomplete grasp of the subject matter covered. Show some evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking with limited competence in professional-level problem solving. Use quality management skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw moderately appropriate but sometimes erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate moderately effective team-based organizational and presentational skills.
D Demonstrate partial but limited grasp, with retention of some relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Show some evidence of coherent and logical thinking, but lacking competence in professional-level problem solving. Use quality management skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw sometimes appropriate but often erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate team-based organizational and presentational skills of limited effectiveness.
Fail Demonstrate little or no grasp, with retention of little relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Show lack of coherent and logical thinking, and minimal competence in professional-level problem solving. Use quality management skills and techniques and analysis of data and results ineffectively, leading generally to inappropriate and usually erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate ineffectiveness team-based organizational and presentational skills.
Course Type Lecture-based course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Lectures with practicals 36
Project work 20
Tutorials 12
Reading / Self study 50
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments Tutorial assessment (40%); Group project and presentation (50%) and Critical review (10%) 100 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
There is no course textbook. Most of the reading material will be provided on Moodle or distributed during lectures.
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk
Additional Course Information


BIOL3218 Food hygiene and quality control (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 30
Course Co-ordinator Dr O Habimana, Biological Sciences < ohabim@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr L Zhang,School of Biological Sciences)
(Dr O Habimana,School of Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives To provide exposure to some key management, microbiology and food processing concepts used to produce safe high-quality food products.  To introduce students to analysis and problem-solving of realistic business situations in food safety management.
Course Contents & Topics - The regulatory, social and business imperative for food safety.
- Basic concepts in TQM
- Statistical Process Control
- Quality Function Deployment
- Quality management standards (ISO 9000)
- Development and implementation of a Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) plan (within an ISO 22000 food safety management system/ supply chain approach)
- Role of environmental management systems (ISO 14000) in the food industry
- A review of microbiology in a food safety context
- Religious, ethical, and cultural food choices
- Illustrative business case studies on food safety management will be discussed
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 understand the basic microbiological and food processing concepts in food safety
CLO 2 be familiar with a set of management techniques applicable in the food industry for promoting food safety
CLO 3 be able to analyze food production problems and make recommendations for action to improve quality and safety
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOL2101 or BIOL3201 or BIOL3203
Not for students who have passed in BIOL3208
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Food & Nutritional Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6 >
2017 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6 >
2016 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6 >
2015 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6 >
2014 Major in Food & Nutritional Science < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        1st sem    Examination Dec     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough grasp of the subject matter covered. Show strong analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, with evidence of creative ability and competence in professional-level problem solving. Critically use quality management skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate highly effective team-based organizational and presentational skills.
B Demonstrate substantial grasp of the subject matter covered. Show evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking with some evidence of competence in professional-level problem solving. Use quality management skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw generally appropriate conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate effective team-based organizational and presentational skills.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete grasp of the subject matter covered. Show some evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking with limited competence in professional-level problem solving. Use quality management skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw moderately appropriate but sometimes erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate moderately effective team-based organizational and presentational skills.
D Demonstrate partial but limited grasp, with retention of some relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Show some evidence of coherent and logical thinking, but lacking competence in professional-level problem solving. Use quality management skills and techniques and analysis of data and results to draw sometimes appropriate but often erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate team-based organizational and presentational skills of limited effectiveness.
Fail Demonstrate little or no grasp, with retention of little relevant information, of the subject matter covered. Show lack of coherent and logical thinking, and minimal competence in professional-level problem solving. Use quality management skills and techniques and analysis of data and results ineffectively, leading generally to inappropriate and usually erroneous conclusions to real-world problems. Demonstrate ineffectiveness team-based organizational and presentational skills.
Course Type Lecture-based course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Group work 12
Lectures 36
Project work 30
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments 20 CLO 2
Examination 50 CLO 1,2,3
Project reports 30 CLO 2,3
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk
Additional Course Information The course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers.


BIOL3301 Marine biology (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 40
Course Co-ordinator Dr M Yasuhara, Biological Sciences < yasuhara@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr B Russell,Biological Sciences)
(Dr M Yasuhara,Biological Sciences)
(Dr S Cannicii,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives To develop a basic understanding and appreciation of the field of marine biology, including the fascinating diversity of marine life, their function, ecology and inter-relationships.  Contemporary issues including the benefits we derive from marine biological resources and threats to their long-term sustainability will also be discussed with case studies highlighting key issues.
Course Contents & Topics The topics cover:
1. The physical and chemical environments (e.g., light, current, atmospheric -ocean interactions, salinity, temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, nutrients) and how these may affect the marine biota
2. Important groups of marine organisms (e.g., phytoplankton, zooplankton, benthos, nekton, marine mammals) and marine food web
3. Major marine habitats and ecosystems (e.g., intertidal, benthic, pelagic, deep sea, coral reefs, mangroves)
4. Exploitation of marine biological resources (e.g., fisheries and bioactive compounds)
5. Contemporary issues (e.g. climate change, marine pollution, sustainable use of marine living resources, invasive species)
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 demonstrate a basic understanding of the diversity and function of marine biota
CLO 2 recognize the interactions of marine biota and their environments
CLO 3 appreciate the importance of marine ecosystems and the threats of human activities on their long-term sustainability as well as possible solutions
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOL2306 or ENVS2002
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Marine Biology ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Marine Biology ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Marine Biology ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Marine Biology ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Marine Biology ( Core/Compulsory )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,6,7 >
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) < PLO 1,2,3,6 >
2017 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,6,7 >
2016 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,6,7 >
2015 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,6,7 >
2014 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,6,7 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        1st sem    Examination Dec     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough mastery at an advanced level of extensive knowledge and skills required for attaining all the course learning outcomes. Show strong analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, with evidence of original thought, and ability to apply knowledge to a wide range of complex, familiar and unfamiliar situations. Apply highly effective organizational and presentational skills.
B Demonstrate substantial command of a broad range of knowledge and skills required for attaining at least most of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, and ability to apply knowledge to familiar and some unfamiliar situations. Apply effective organizational and presentational skills.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete command of knowledge and skills required for attaining most of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of some analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, and ability to apply knowledge to most familiar situations. Apply moderately effective organizational and presentational skills.
D Demonstrate partial but limited command of knowledge and skills required for attaining some of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of some coherent and logical thinking, but with limited analytical and critical abilities. Show limited ability to apply knowledge to solve problems. Apply limited or barely effective organizational and presentational skills.
Fail Demonstrate little or no evidence of command of knowledge and skills required for attaining the course learning outcomes. Lack of analytical and critical abilities, logical and coherent thinking. Show very little or no ability to apply knowledge to solve problems. Organization and presentational skills are minimally effective or ineffective.
Course Type Lecture with laboratory component course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Field work field trip, laboratory practical & tutorials 30
Lectures 24
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments 20 CLO 1,2,3
Examination 80 CLO 1,2,3
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Levinton, J. S. 2001. Marine Biology; function, biodiversity, ecology 2nd edition. 515 pp. Oxford University Press    
Nybakken, J.W. and Bertness, M.D.,  2004.  Marine Biology: An Ecological Approach, 6th Edition, Benjamin Cummings.
H. V. Thurman and E. A. Burton: Introductory Oceanography (Prentice Hall, 2001, 9th ed.)
J. W. Nybakken: Marine Biology: An Ecological View (Benjamin Cummings, 2000)
TBC
Course Website http://www.biosch.hku.hk/ecology/lsc/
Additional Course Information


BIOL3302 Systematics and phylogenetics (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 60
Course Co-ordinator Prof R M K Saunders, Biological Sciences < saunders@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Prof R M K Saunders,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives To give students an understanding of the principles of systematics and phylogenetics and an appreciation of current trends and controversies.  Systematics forms an invaluable grounding for many fields of biology (including anatomy, ecology, population biology and evolutionary biology), and enables the integration of a wide range of techniques (including anatomy, biochemistry, chemistry, molecular biology, cytology, palaeontology and ethology).
Course Contents & Topics Currrent classificatory theories: phenetic systematics (classifications based on overall resemblances) and cladistics (evolutionary reconstruction).  The species concept.  Sources of taxonomic data: morphology & anatomy, biochemistry, chemistry, molecular biology, cytology, and ethology.  Causes of taxonomies complexity: environmental factors; hybridization; breeding systems.  Principles of nomenclature.  Laboratory sessions will be aimed at illustrating taxonomic procedures and problems; students will not be expected to memorize large numbers of scientific names.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 explain taxon concepts (with particular reference to species) and show how multivariate statistical methods can be applied below the species level
CLO 2 describe the principles behind maximum parsimony methods of phylogenetic reconstruction (including sister-group relationships, out-group comparison, homoplasy and the assessment of clade stability)
CLO 3 evaluate the diversity of sources of taxonomic data, and explain the importance of specific data sources
CLO 4 recognise the main causes of taxonomic complexity, and identify appropriate solutions
CLO 5 understand the principles of nomenclature in order to interpret the previous application of scientific names are validly publish new names
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOL1309; and
Any level 2 BIOL course
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6 >
2017 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2016 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2015 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2014 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        1st sem    Examination Dec     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough mastery at an advanced level of extensive knowledge required for attaining most or all of the course learning outcomes, with evidence of extensive background reading and use of named examples. Show evidence of significant critical abilities and logical thinking. Apply highly effective presentation skills. Demonstrate effective use of data and results to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions. Show evidence of integration of a wide range of appropriate theories, principles, evidence and techniques.
B Demonstrate substantial command of knowledge required for attaining most of the course learning outcomes, with evidence of some background reading and use of named examples. Show evidence of critical abilities and logical thinking. Apply effective presentation skills. Demonstrate use of data and results to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions. Show evidence of general integration of appropriate theories, principles, evidence and techniques.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete command of knowledge and skills required for attaining most of the course learning outcomes, with evidence of limited background reading and use of named examples. Show evidence of some critical abilities and logical thinking. Apply moderately effective presentation skills. Demonstrate mostly correct use of data and results to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions. Show evidence of partial integration of appropriate theories, principles, evidence and techniques.
D Demonstrate partial but limited command of knowledge and skills required for attaining some of the course learning outcomes, with insufficient evidence of background reading and use of named examples. Show evidence of limited critical abilities and logical thinking. Apply limited presentation skills. Demonstrate limited ability to use data and results to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions. Show evidence of limited integration of appropriate theories, principles, evidence and techniques.
Fail Demonstrate little or no evidence of command of knowledge and skills required for attaining the course learning outcomes, with no evidence of background reading or use of named examples. Show little or no evidence of critical abilities and logical thinking. Presentational skills are minimally effective or ineffective. Misuse of data and results to draw appropriate conclusions. Little or no evidence of integration of appropriate theories, principles, evidence and techniques.
Course Type Lecture with laboratory component course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Laboratory 24
Lectures 24
Project work 12
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments 15 CLO 1,3,4,5
Examination 70 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Laboratory reports 15 CLO 1,3
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
E. Mayr & P. D. Ashlock: Principles of Systematic Zoology (McGraw-Hill, 1991, 2nd ed.)
W. S. Judd et al.: Plant Systematics - A Phylogenetic Approach (Sinauer, 1999)
TBC
Course Website http://www.biosch.hku.hk/ecology/lsc/
Additional Course Information


BIOL3303 Conservation biology (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 60
Course Co-ordinator Dr T C Bonebrake, Biological Sciences < tbone@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr L G Gibson,Biological Sciences)
(Dr T C Bonebrake,Biological Sciences)
(Prof Y Sadovy,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives To introduce students to the theory and practice of conservation and to provide students with a thorough understanding of practical, economic and management skills required for proficiency in conservation biology. Our ultimate aim is to promote an understanding of the natural biodiversity, the threats to it, and the best ways to manage them. We hope these will be your aims too, and that you will be able to use the skills and knowledge you learn from the course to reduce the local, regional and global loss of biodiversity.
Course Contents & Topics Among the many environmental issues, the most serious is the increasingly rapid loss of biodiversity. This loss is irreversible on a human timescale and will reduce the options available to all future human generations. Conservation Biology/Ecology is the science of preserving biological diversity. This course also provides insights to the many benefits and services that nature offers and explores strategies for management options to sustain ecological integrity and production. It is an inexact, applied, mission-orientated, multidisciplinary science which, like medicine, has built-in values: to a conservation biologist, as to a doctor, it matters whether the patient lives or dies. It is also a very new science, bringing together elements from ecology, environmental science, forestry, resource management and many other fields.

The course is designed to provide the knowledge, theories, and research related to biodiversity conservation. Our teaching focuses on biodiversity conservation, conservation issues associated with climate change, the key theoretical underpinning of biodiversity conservation and an introduction to conservation legislation and economics. We emphasis on the integration of knowledge, skills and abilities that are required to practice conservation. Our problem based learning approach will require students to actively participate in their group project/class room debate by researching.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 develop a framework for critical thinking about biodiversity, environment and human interaction
CLO 2 understand why species are becoming extinct and predict which ones will be most vulnerable
CLO 3 understand the importance of the threat of tropical deforestation, marine and coastal degradation, and habitat fragmentation in species extinction, and explain the main forces behind habitat and biodiversity loss
CLO 4 understand the principles of population viability analysis, the basis of single-species conservation management and the role of ex situ conservation, ecological restoration and reintroduction in conservation
CLO 5 outline the legal and administrative basis for conservation in Hong Kong and the world
CLO 6 appreciate the roles and relationships of economic, social and environmental sciences in the conservation of biodiversity
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOL2306
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Major in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Major in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Major in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Environmental Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,4,5,6,7 >
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) < PLO 1,4,5,6 >
2018 Major in Environmental Science < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2017 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,4,5,6,7 >
2017 Major in Environmental Science < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2016 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,4,5,6,7 >
2016 Major in Environmental Science < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2015 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,4,5,6,7 >
2015 Major in Environmental Science < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2014 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,4,5,6,7 >
2014 Major in Environmental Science < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        2nd sem    Examination May     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough mastery at an advanced level of extensive knowledge and skills required for attaining all course learning outcomes. Show strong analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, with evidence of original thought, ability to integrate and synthesize information, and ability to apply knowledge to a wide range of complex, familiar and unfamiliar situations. Apply highly effective presentational skills. Strong evidence of clear attention to thoughtful and reflective thinking.
B Demonstrate substantial command of a broad range of knowledge and skills required for attaining at least most of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, integration of materials and ability to apply knowledge to familiar and some unfamiliar situations. Demonstrate effective presentational skills. Evidence of clear attention to thoughtful and reflective thinking
C Demonstrate general but incomplete command of knowledge and skills required for attaining most of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of some analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, and ability to apply knowledge to most familiar situations. Apply moderately effective presentational skills. Little evidence of clear attention to thoughtful and reflective thinking.
D Demonstrate partial but limited command of knowledge and skills required for attaining some of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of some coherent and logical thinking, but with limited analytical and critical abilities and little attempt at integration. Show limited ability to apply knowledge to solve problems. Apply limited effectiveness in presentational skills. Lack of attention to thoughtful and reflective thinking.
Fail Demonstrate little or no evidence of command of knowledge and skills required for attaining the course learning outcomes. Lack of analytical and critical abilities, logical and coherent thinking. Show very little or no ability to apply knowledge to solve problems. Organization and presentational skills are minimally effective or ineffective.
Course Type Lecture with laboratory component course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Field work 10
Group work 8
Lectures 24
Tutorials 14
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments 20 CLO 1,2,3,4,5,6
Examination 60 CLO 1,2,3,4,5,6
Presentation group presentation 10 CLO 1,2,3,5,6
Test 10 CLO 1,2,3
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
R. B. Primack: Essentials of Conservation Biology (Sinauer, 2006, 4th ed.)
V. D. Fred: Conservation biology [electronic resource]: foundations, concepts, applications (Springer, 2008)  
M.L. Hunter and J.P. Gibbs: Fundamentals of Conservation Biology (Blackwell, 2007, 3rd Ed)
William J. Sutherland: The Conservation Handbook: Research, Management and Policy (Blackwell Science, 2008)
NIL
Course Website http://www.biosch.hku.hk/ecology/lsc/
Additional Course Information


BIOL3305 Tropical and temperate marine ecology field course (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 15
Course Co-ordinator Dr B Russell, Biological Sciences < brussell@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr B Russell,Biological Sciences)
(Dr S Cannicci,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives This course uses a field-based approach to provide students with an advanced understanding of marine and estuarine ecology in both tropical and temperate regions. Students will learn scientific techniques in Hong Kong and then apply them to compare these ecosystems in Australia, experiencing their similarities and differences. The course culminates with students developing field-based research projects to answer ecological questions, using creative and innovative thinking to overcome problems for successful outcomes.
Course Contents & Topics The course will cover the structure and function of mangrove forests, reefs (coral and rocky), and algal forests in both tropical and temperate regions. Students will be introduced to the concepts in the course through a series of lectures and field trips in Hong Kong before travelling to northern and southern Australia to experience the ecosystems in the field. The lectures will provide students with background knowledge about the ecosystems which they will encounter, the structure and function of the systems and how human activities degrade them, sampling techniques, logical experimental design, and good report writing practices. These concepts will be drawn together in the field with students quantifying species richness, observing system structure and testing hypotheses with experiments that they design themselves.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 demonstrate an understanding of the complexity and function of marine ecosystems.
CLO 2 explain the role of physical and biological processes in shaping the similarities and differences among marine ecosystems in tropical and temperate regions.
CLO 3 demonstrate skills for field sampling in marine and estuarine habitats.
CLO 4 demonstrate knowledge in hypothesis testing and experimental design.
CLO 5 identify a range of marine species and their role in ecosystems.
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in "C" or above in  BIOL2306 or BIOL3301 or BIOL3303 or ENVS2001
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6 >
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        Summer    Examination No Exam     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Evidence of a thorough grasp of the subject and relevant research techniques. Eagerness and enthusiasm to learn and excellent familiarity with relevant background reading and case studies. Exemplary handling of field data collection and excellent analytical skills. Ample evidence of independent critical thought with excellent use of a broad range of fundamental concepts and broader comparative perspective to draw insightful and logical conclusions. Show outstanding abilities of independent work, effective presentation skills with excellent analytical argumentation. Excellent or outstanding work relative to what is required at degree level.
B Evidence of a good grasp of the subject and relevant research techniques. Interest in learning and good-to-moderate familiarity with relevant background reading and case studies. Good handling of field data collection and commendable analytical skills. Good evidence of critical thought (although not always independent), with an appreciable use of fundamental concepts and consideration of broader comparative perspective in drawing logical conclusions. Good abilities of independent work, effective presentation skills with logical and analytical argumentation. Work more than sufficient for what is required at degree level.
C Demonstrate an adequate, but incomplete grasp of the subject and relevant research techniques. Moderate familiarity with relevant background reading and case studies, but no interest in learning beyond the adequate average level. Evidence of logical critical thinking (although not always independent), with mostly good use of fundamental concepts to draw logical conclusions. Fair presentation skills, with mostly correct argumentation, but limited (or no) abilities to integrate broader concepts. Work sufficient for what is required for degree level.
D Demonstrate some grasp of the subject, but only partial and with limited understanding of relevant research concepts and research techniques. Some familiarity with relevant case studies, but insufficient evidence of background reading and limited abilities of critical independent thinking. Ineffective presentation skills with generally weak logical argumentation with restricted ability of drawing appropriate conclusions. Work barely meets what is required at degree level.
Fail No evidence of basic a minimum grasp of the subject and the minimum relevant research techniques. No evidence of background reading and no familiarity with any relevant examples and case studies. Inadequate evidence of coherent logical thought; ineffective presentation skills with poor argumentation and no abilities to draw meaningful conclusions. Work fails to reach degree level.
Course Type Field camps
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Field work Field course: 80 hrs + travel time 80
Lectures Pre-course lectures and field trips 20
Reading / Self study 40
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments Presentation 20 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Report Field report (20%) + Project report (55%) 75 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Test Pre-trip quiz 5 CLO 1
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Students will be directed to relevant scientific literature and websites
Course Website http://www.biosch.hku.hk/ecology/lsc
Additional Course Information This course involves a two-week field course to Australia, one week in the Sydney (temperate region) and one week on Orpheus Island (tropical region). Students will be exposed to some harsh environmental conditions including working in contact with seawater, potentially cold and rainy weather. Orpheus Island can have an abundance of biting insects (mosquitos and sand flies).

There will be extra costs involved in the course, including but not limited to airfares, accommodation and meal costs.

Enrollment Procedure:
Enrollment for this course will close at the end of the add/drop period of the second semester because airfares and accommodation for the trip need to be booked in advance.


BIOL3313 Freshwater ecology (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 30
Course Co-ordinator Prof D Dudgeon, Biological Sciences < ddudgeon@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Prof D Dudgeon,School of Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives This course introduces freshwater science by integrating the physical and biological components of rivers and their drainage basins in the context of sustaining human livelihoods and biodiversity. Conservation and management of lakes and maintenance of water quality are considered also. Case studies are used to illustrate the principles of river science and human use of drainage basins. Emphasis will be placed upon conservation of freshwater biodiversity in Asia in the context of increasing human modification of ecosystems, habitat degradation and water scarcity.
Course Contents & Topics The amount of water on Earth is fixed. Less than 0.01% of the world's water is in lakes and rivers, yet this water hosts 10% of the Earth's species. Global water use has increased 300% since 1950 and is growing faster than the Earth's population; many people in Asia already face water stress. This course introduces the physicochemical processes involved in the hydrological cycle and flow of water in drainage basins, as well as their seasonal fluctuations, and describes the main longitudinal changes that occur along rivers and their floodplains. Energy flows in freshwater ecosystems are described with particular reference to the transfer of materials between water and land and the relative importance of aquatic primary production versus energy derived from detrital inputs from the land. The range of organisms associated with Asian fresh waters is introduced and their functional roles explained, and students will become familiar with some common Hong Kong species in field trips and laboratory sessions. The dependence of humans on freshwater ecosystems and the role they play in sustaining livelihoods is explained, together with the causes and consequences of human modification of fresh waters, and the implications for conservation of aquatic biodiversity. Finally the range of management strategies used to reduce or mitigate human impacts on freshwater ecosystems and maintain water quality is introduced.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 describe the global water cycle, the main sources and pathways of energy in freshwaters, and the influence of land-water interactions on aquatic productivity
CLO 2 describe the composition of the freshwater biota (major groups) and their functional roles in aquatic ecosystems, and identify some of the common animals that occur in Hong Kong fresh waters
CLO 3 describe the results of modification of freshwater ecosystems by humans, list the main threats to freshwater biodiversity in Asia, explain why freshwater biota are vulnerable to human impacts, and indicate the management strategies used to reduce or mitigate them
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOL2102 and BIOL2306
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6 >
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        1st sem    Examination Dec     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 N
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Evidence of original logical (or coherent) thought, strong analytical (or critical) abilities and a thorough grasp of the subject as demonstrated by background reading and excellent use of named (organism) examples. Show excellent presentational, analytical skills and/or lab/field skills, and substantial knowledge of general freshwater biodiveristy or selected taxa. Excellent or outstanding (for A+) work relative to what is required at degree level.
B Evidence of analytical (or critical) abilities and logical (or coherent) - but not necessarily original - thinking, a good grasp of the subject as demonstrated by background reading and use of named (organism) examples. Show good presentational, analytical and/or lab/field skills, and knowledge of general freshwater biodiversity or selected taxa. Work more than sufficient for what is required at degree level.
C Evidence of some analytical (or critical) abilities and logical (or coherert) thinking with an adequate (but incomplete) grasp of the subject, but little or no evidence of original thinking, with limited background reading and use of named (organism) examples. Show fair presentational, analytical and/or lab/field skills, and some knowledge of general freshwater biodiversity or selected taxa. Work sufficient for what is required for degree level.
D Evidence of retention of a minimum of relevant information of the subject (i.e. knowledge is very incomplete), with limited organizational, analytical or presentational skills. Shows insufficient evidence of background reading, or familiarity with lab/field techniques or freshwater biodiversity. Work merely (for D+) or barely (D) adequate for what is required at degree level.
Fail Evidence of poor or inadequate knowledge and understanding of the subject, and a lack of coherence, poor organization and/or excessive irrelevancy. Little or no evidence of familiarity with relevant reading material and lab/field techniques, or any knowledge of freshwater biodiversity. Work fails to reach degree level.
Course Type Lecture with laboratory component course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Laboratory project and laboratory work; field trips to local streams and wetlands 40
Lectures 26
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments 30 CLO 2
Examination 60 CLO 1,2,3
Laboratory reports 10 CLO 3
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Allan, J.D. & Castillo, M.M. (2007). Stream Ecology. Springer.

The Mekong River Awareness Kit (RAK) http://www.mrcmekong.org/RAK/html/rak_frameset.html  
An online training tool developed by an international team (including the course coordinator) that contains information on the physical and biological features of rivers, and shows how human livelihoods depend on river health.

A list of references available in HKU library will be provided for each lecture on the course website.
Course Website http://www.biosch.hku.hk/ecology/lsc/
Additional Course Information Offer in alternate year from 2017-2018
This course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers.


   <<< This course is not offered in 2018 - 2019. Course details are subject to change. >>>
BIOL3314 Plant structure and evolution (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 30
Course Co-ordinator Prof R M K Saunders, Biological Sciences < saunders@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Prof R M K Saunders,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives To survey the form and function of the vascular plant body, with particular emphasis on the evolutionary significance of structures. This course forms a basis for understanding plant physiology, ecology, systematics and phylogenetics.
Course Contents & Topics The course will investigate various cell, tissue and organ types in the vascular plant body, with functional explanations for their diversity and discussions of the value of such knowledge in understanding plant phylogeny. Information on plant structure will be integrated with our current understanding of developmental genetics and taxonomic relationships derived from molecular phylogenetic research. Topics such as food storage, strength, water conduction, growth and development, pollination, fertilization, fruit and seed dispersal, germination, etc., will be discussed.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 recognise the main plant cell types and explain how cells are integrated to form specific primary tissues (such as the xylem and phloem)
CLO 2 describe the developmental changes that occur in primary tissues with the onset of secondary growth
CLO 3 describe the structure, function and development of secondary vegetative structures (wood and bark)
CLO 4 integrate knowledge of the genetic control of floral development with the evolution of organ diversity
CLO 5 describe the structure of fruits from a functional perspective, and recognise how these structures are derived from the flower
CLO 6 explain how seeds develop after fertilization of the ovule, and how differences in seed structure influences germination patterns
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOL1309; and
Any level 2 BIOL course
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Plant Science ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6 >
2017 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2016 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 N        To be confirmed Examination To be confirmed
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough mastery at an advanced level of extensive knowledge required for attaining most or all of the course learning outcomes, with evidence of extensive background reading and use of named examples. Show evidence of significant critical abilities and logical thinking. Apply highly effective presentation skills. Demonstrate effective use of data and results to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions.
B Demonstrate substantial command of knowledge required for attaining most of the course learning outcomes, with evidence of some background reading and use of named examples. Show evidence of critical abilities and logical thinking. Apply effective presentation skills. Demonstrate use of data and results to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete command of knowledge and skills required for attaining most of the course learning outcomes, with evidence of limited background reading and use of named examples. Show evidence of some critical abilities and logical thinking. Apply moderately effective presentation skills. Demonstrate mostly correct use of data and results to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions.
D Demonstrate partial but limited command of knowledge and skills required for attaining some of the course learning outcomes, with insufficient evidence of background reading and use of named examples. Show evidence of limited critical abilities and logical thinking. Apply limited presentation skills. Demonstrate limited ability to use data and results to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions.
Fail Demonstrate little or no evidence of command of knowledge and skills required for attaining the course learning outcomes, with no evidence of background reading or use of named examples. Show little or no evidence of critical abilities and logical thinking. Presentational skills are minimally effective or ineffective. Misuse of data and results to draw appropriate conclusions.
Course Type Lecture with laboratory component course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Laboratory 36
Lectures 24
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Examination 70 CLO 1,2,3,4,5,6
Laboratory reports 30 CLO 1,2,3,4,5,6
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
P. Rudall: Anatomy of Flowering Plants, 3rd ed. Cambridge Univ. Press (2007)
P.H. Raven, R.F. Evert & S.E. Eichhorn: Biology of Plants, 7th ed. Freeman (2005)
A list of additional reading material will be provided during the course.
Course Website http://www.biosch.hku.hk/ecology/lsc/
Additional Course Information Offer in alternative year from 2018-2019
This course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers.


BIOL3318 Experimental intertidal ecology (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 20
Course Co-ordinator Prof G A Williams, Biological Sciences < hrsbwga@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Prof G A Williams,School of Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives To examine the communities of coastal systems: their distribution, composition and the factors which regulate them.  This course will examine, using an experimental approach, patterns exhibited by a range of shores and the deterministic and stochastic processes that create and sustain them.  Hong Kong shores will be used as examples but comparisons will be drawn from the coastlines of the world.
Course Contents & Topics The first part of this course describes shores of the marine to brackish water continuum and the communities found on them.  Lectures will cover the physical environment of the intertidal (e.g. tides; waves; geological and hydrological processes) the resultant variations in exposure and shore types and consequent distribution of animals and algae on these shores (vertical and horizontal zonation patterns) with specific Hong Kong examples.  The second part of the course uses an experimental approach (e.g. sampling methodology; manipulative techniques; experimental design and data analysis) to investigate the factors (e.g. predation; herbivory; competition; disturbance; succession; patchiness and recruitment; supply side ecology) that structure these shores, with particular focus on rocky intertidal shores.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 describe the physical environmental factors (e.g., waves, tides) shaping the intertidal environment and how they interact with geographic features to produce different kinds of shores (e.g., sandy shores, mangroves)
CLO 2 understand the factors limiting species distribution patterns on the vertical intertidal gradient and appreciate methods to measure and investigate these patterns
CLO 3 identify and quantify the distribution of a variety of local species on different Hong Kong shores
CLO 4 review, critique and design experimental studies to investigate patterns (e.g., zonation) and processes (e.g., herbivory, competition) in intertidal areas
CLO 5 explain the role of biological processes (e.g., predation, succession) and their interaction with the physical environment in shaping intertidal communities
CLO 6 plan, design, execute, analyse and present a simple experimental study on intertidal ecology
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOL2102 or BIOL3301
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6 >
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        2nd sem    Examination May     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 N
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Evidence of original, logical (or coherent) thought, strong analytical and critical abilities and a thorough grasp of the subject as demonstrated by background reading and excellent use of named (organism) examples. Show excellent presentational, analytical skills and/or lab/field skills, and demonstrate substantial knowledge of general intertidal ecology and excellent experimental design and analysis skills.
B Evidence of analytical (or critical) abilities and logical (or coherent), but not necessarily original, thinking, a good grasp of the subject as demonstrated by background reading and use of named (organism) examples. Show good presentational, analytical and/or lab/field skills, and demonstrate knowledge of general intertidal ecology and good experimental design and analysis skills.
C Evidence of some analytical (or critical) abilities and logical (or coherent) thinking with an adequate (but incomplete) grasp of the subject, but little or no evidence of original thinking, limited background reading and use of named (organism) examples. Show fair presentational, analytical and/or lab/field skills, and demonstrates some knowledge of general intertidal ecology and adequate abilities of experimental design and analysis.
D Evidence of retention of a minimum of relevant information of the subject (i.e. knowledge is very incomplete), with limited organizational, analytical or presentational skills. Show insufficient evidence of background reading, or familiarity with lab/field techniques. Poor knowledge of general intertidal ecology and misunderstanding of experimental design and analysis.
Fail Evidence of poor or inadequate knowledge and understanding of the subject, and a lack of coherence, poor organization and/or excessive irrelevancy. Limited or no evidence of familiarity with relevant reading material and lab/field techniques, or knowledge of general intertidal ecology, and misuse of experimental design and analysis skills.
Course Type Lecture with laboratory component course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Field work field trip/project work 28
Lectures 16
Project work 6
Tutorials 4
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments 40 CLO 1,2,3,4,5,6
Examination 60 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Morton, B. & Morton, J.: The Seashore Ecology of Hong Kong (Hong Kong University Press, 1983)
Little, C. & Williams, G.A. & Trowbridge, C.D.: The Biology of Rocky Shores (Oxford University Press, 2009)
TBC
Course Website http://www.biosch.hku.hk/ecology/lsc/
Additional Course Information Offer in alternate year from 2017-2018
This course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers.


BIOL3319 Tropical terrestrial ecology (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 30
Course Co-ordinator Dr B Guenard, Biological Sciences < bguenard@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr B Guenard,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives To enable motivated students to acquire the knowledge and skills needed to solve real problems in terrestrial ecology.
Course Contents & Topics This course focuses on the ecology of terrestrial habitats providing an overview of patterns and processes at global and regional scale. Students will learn about the evolution of climate and topography over geological times and their roles in shaping current biodiversity and ecosystems distribution. The course also focuses on the taxonomic, functional and ecological composition of organisms within terrestrial ecosystems of Tropical East Asia with emphasis on the major processes regulating communities. An introduction to several global major threats on terrestrial ecosystems and their mechanisms is provided. Finally, the study of habitats recovery through ecological succession using particular examples in Hong Kong is provided.

The practical component of the course will introduce students to basic field techniques used in ecology. Students will participate to a group project, collecting and analysing their own data involving both field and laboratory work, and write a short scientific paper. Particular emphasis will be given on how to efficiently read and write scientific literature and present data efficiently. Attendance and participation in class are encouraged through series of discussions to stimulate critical thinking on chosen topics in terrestrial ecology. Assessment includes problem-based learning exercise, group presentation, a final term paper and a final examination covering the content of the course.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 understand evolution of biodiversity patterns and shaping processes within terrestrial ecosystems at different geographic and time scales
CLO 2 understand the current patterns that sustain biodiversity in their pristine form and disturbed state
CLO 3 understand the various threats to terrestrial ecosystems and some of the methods to evaluate and reduce the impacts of those threats
CLO 4 plan and conduct baseline study of terrestrial biodiversity
CLO 5 develop the skill to be an active learner through the problem-based learning exercises
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOL1309 and BIOL2306
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6 >
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        2nd sem    Examination May     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough mastery at an advanced level of extensive knowledge and skills required for attaining all course learning outcomes. Show strong analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, with evidence of original thought, ability to integrate and synthesize information, and ability to apply knowledge to a wide range of complex, familiar and unfamiliar situations. Apply highly effective presentational skills. Strong evidence of clear attention to thoughtful and reflective thinking.
B Demonstrate substantial command of a broad range of knowledge and skills required for attaining at least most of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, integration of materials and ability to apply knowledge to familiar and some unfamiliar situations. Demonstrate effective presentational skills. Evidence of clear attention to thoughtful and reflective thinking.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete command of knowledge and skills required for attaining most of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of some analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, and ability to apply knowledge to most familiar situations. Apply moderately effective presentational skills. Little evidence of clear attention to thoughtful and reflective thinking.
D Demonstrate partial but limited command of knowledge and skills required for attaining some of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of some coherent and logical thinking, but with limited analytical and critical abilities and little attempt at integration. Show limited ability to apply knowledge to solve problems. Apply limited effectiveness in presentational skills. Lack of attention to thoughtful and reflective thinking.
Fail Demonstrate little or no evidence of command of knowledge and skills required for attaining the course learning outcomes. Lack of analytical and critical abilities, logical and coherent thinking. Show very little or no ability to apply knowledge to solve problems. Organization and presentational skills are minimally effective or ineffective.
Course Type Lecture with laboratory component course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Laboratory laboratory & field work 24
Lectures 24
Tutorials 14
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments 10 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Examination 40 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Presentation 25 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Project report 25 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Corlett R.T. : The Ecology of Tropical East Asia (Oxford University Press, 2009).
Dudgeon D. and Corlett R. T.: Ecology and Biodiversity of Hong Kong (Friends of the Country Parks, Hong Kong)
To be provided in classes
Course Website http://www.biosch.hku.hk/ecology/lsc/
Additional Course Information This course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers.


   <<< This course is not offered in 2018 - 2019. Course details are subject to change. >>>
BIOL3320 The biology of marine mammals (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 30
Course Co-ordinator , Biological Sciences
Teachers Involved
Course Objectives Few other groups of animals have captured the public's imagination the way marine mammals, especially whales and dolphins have. This course covers the evolutionary biology, ecology, behaviour, and conservation of marine mammals: whales, dolphins and porpoises (cetaceans), seals and walruses (pinnipeds), manatees and dugongs (sirenians) and sea otters. Students will learn to understand the ecology of mammalian life in the aquatic environment, their role in the marine ecosystem, their behavioural complexity and socio-ecology, and the current threats to these animals in the human-dominated world.
Course Contents & Topics The course begins with an overview of marine mammal species and their global distribution, followed by a review of the various adaptations that have evolved to meet the challenges of the marine environment. Next, the course discusses the life history, reproductive strategies, ecology and population dynamics of marine mammals, highlighting the similarities and differences between species in this taxonomically diverse group of animals. This is followed by sessions on behaviour and behavioural ecology; here we discuss animal movement, diving and ranging behaviour, foraging strategies, ecology of group living and social behaviour, behavioural complexity, cognition, and social strategies that guide the daily lives of these animals. The course concludes with a discussion of human influences on the fate of marine mammals, examples of critically endangered species and populations, and a review of conservation and management strategies; our emphasis is on the importance of applying the knowledge of population ecology, behaviour and behavioural ecology in ensuring long-term effective conservation of marine mammal populations. This course is designed for 3rd and 4th year students; it includes field trips, discussions of current scientific research, innovative research techniques and recent discoveries. Students will undertake independent literature-searches and will discuss their projects during classroom debates, training their skills in conceptual and analytical approaches to science.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 appreciate marine mammal diversity and biogeography
CLO 2 understand how mammals adapt and function in an aquatic environment and their role in the marine ecosystem
CLO 3 understand and appreciate the complexity of interactions between environmental selective pressures and marine mammal behaviour, population structure and demography
CLO 4 appreciate the socio-ecological diversity and behavioural complexity of marine mammals
CLO 5 think analytically in terms of marine mammal ecology and anthropogenic impacts in the rapidly changing world
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOL2306
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2U000C00 Course not offered under any Major/Minor/Professional core
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 N        To be confirmed Examination To be confirmed
Offer in 2019 - 2020 N
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Evidence of a thorough grasp of the subject in a broader comparative perspective as demonstrated by background reading and excellent use of named examples and case studies. Evidence of independent critical thought with excellent use of a broad range of fundamental concepts to draw insightful and logical conclusions. Show eagerness to learn, great abilities of independent work, effective presentation skills with excellent analytical argumentation. Excellent or outstanding work relative to what is required at degree level.
B Evidence of a good grasp of the subject as demonstrated by some background reading and appropriate use of named examples and some case studies. Evidence of good critical thought, although not necessarily original. Good and very good (but not outstanding) abilities of independent work, effective presentation skills with good analytical and logical argumentation. Good general command of acquired knowledge to draw meaningful and logical conclusions. Work more than sufficient for what is required at degree level.
C Demonstrate an adequate, but not coherent and incomplete grasp of the subject, with limited background reading and limited use of named examples and case studies. Some abilities of logical critical thinking, but not insightful and/or independent; only partial abilities to use acquired knowledge and work independently to draw meaningful conclusions. Fair presentation skills, with mostly correct argumentation, but limited (or no) abilities to integrate broader concepts. Work sufficient for what is required for degree level.
D Demonstrate some grasp of the subject, but partial and limited to the most basic concepts, examples, and limited (or none) case studies. Insufficient evidence of background reading, limited abilities of critical independent thinking, and not particularly effective presentation skills with generally weak logical argumentation and restricted ability of drawing appropriate conclusions. Work barely meets what is required at degree level.
Fail No evidence of basic minimum knowledge and understanding of the subject. No evidence of background reading and no familiarity with any relevant examples and case studies. Inadequate evidence of coherent logical thought; ineffective presentation skills with poor argumentation and no abilities to draw meaningful conclusions. Work fails to reach degree level.
Course Type Lecture with laboratory component course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Laboratory including field trips, research site vists, demonstration of research techniques, interactive classroom debates 32
Lectures 24
Project work project work review 8
Reading / Self study 60
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments including active participation/continuous assessment/presentation 55 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Examination 45 CLO 1,2,3,4,5
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Hoelzel AR (ed). Marine mammal biology: An evolutionary approach  (Blackwell Science 2002)
Reynolds JE & Rommel SA (eds).  Biology of marine mammals (Smithsonian Institution Press 1999)
Perrin WF, Wursig B & Thewissen JGM (eds).  Encyclopedia of marine mammals (Academic Press 2008)
Mann J, Connor RC, Tyack PL & Whitehead H (eds).  Cetacean societies (The University of Chicago Press 2000)
Course Website http://www.biosch.hku.hk/ecology/lsc/
Additional Course Information This course is offered in alternate year.
This course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers.


   <<< This course is not offered in 2018 - 2019. Course details are subject to change. >>>
BIOL3322 Marine invertebrate zoology (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 30
Course Co-ordinator Dr S Cannicci, Biological Sciences < cannicci@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr S Cannicci,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives This course introduces the students to the diversity, biology and ecology of marine invertebrates. Students will be introduced to various aspects of the systematics, anatomy, physiology and functional ecology of the major phyla of marine invertebrates to appreciate the diversity of body plans and ecological roles these animals play in costal, benthic and pelagic ecosystems. The course will particularly focus on the South East Asian seas, which are the most diverse marine systems in the world.
Course Contents & Topics Invertebrates make up 95% of all animal species. While insects dominate the terrestrial landscapes, marine environments have a much broader phyletic diversity, with taxa such as Porifera (sponges), Polychaetes (marine worms), Coelenterata (corals and sea anemones) and Echinoderms (sea urchins and starfish) entirely confined to the seas. Together with marine molluscs and crustaceans, these groups play fundamental roles in the functioning of all marine ecosystems, and are a fundamental focus of evolutionary studies of extant taxa and their fossil relatives.
This course will lead the students through the discovery of the amazing variety of body plans, adaptations, structure and function of marine invertebrates. In the first part of the course, the study of the phylogenetic relationships and the body plans of marine invertebrates groups, together with the associated evolutionary pathways, will be described to provide students with an evolutionary grand tour of life on Earth. In the second part, students will learn the mechanisms underpinning the ecological functions of marine ecosystems, through the study of the functional biology and ecology of the dominant groups. The diversity of invertebrates present in South East Asian seas will be introduced, and students will become familiar the commonest Hong Kong taxa and species in field trips and laboratory sessions.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 identify major taxa of marine invertebrates
CLO 2 describe the evolutionary history of the different taxa , understanding their relationships
CLO 3 describe the composition of the invertebrates communities and their roles in marine ecosystems, and learn to identify common species and taxa typical of Hong Kong coastal waters
CLO 4 understand the functional biology of marine invertebrates and their contribution to ecological functioning of marine ecosystems
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOL2306
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,5,6,7 >
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) < PLO 1,2,3,5,6 >
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,5,6,7 >
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,5,6,7 >
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,5,6,7 >
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,2,3,5,6,7 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 N        To be confirmed Examination To be confirmed
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Evidence of a thorough grasp of the subject and relevant research techniques. Eagerness and enthusiasm to learn and excellent familiarity with relevant background reading and case studies. Exemplary handling of field data collection and excellent analytical skills. Ample evidence of independent critical thought with excellent use of a broad range of fundamental concepts and broader comparative perspective to draw insightful and logical conclusions. Show outstanding abilities of independent work, effective presentation skills with excellent analytical argumentation. Excellent or outstanding work relative to what is required at degree level.
B Evidence of a good grasp of the subject and relevant research techniques. Interest in learning and good-to-moderate familiarity with relevant background reading and case studies. Good handling of field data collection and commendable analytical skills. Good evidence of critical thought (although not always independent), with an appreciable use of fundamental concepts and consideration of broader comparative perspective in drawing logical conclusions. Good abilities of independent work, effective presentation skills with logical and analytical argumentation. Work more than sufficient for what is required at degree level.
C Demonstrate an adequate, but incomplete grasp of the subject and relevant research techniques. Moderate familiarity with relevant background reading and case studies, but no interest in learning beyond the adequate average level. Evidence of logical critical thinking (although not always independent), with mostly good use of fundamental concepts to draw logical conclusions. Fair presentation skills, with mostly correct argumentation, but limited (or no) abilities to integrate broader concepts. Work sufficient for what is required for degree level.
D Demonstrate some grasp of the subject, but only partial and with limited understanding of relevant research concepts and research techniques. Some familiarity with relevant case studies, but insufficient evidence of background reading and limited abilities of critical independent thinking. Ineffective presentation skills with generally weak logical argumentation with restricted ability of drawing appropriate conclusions. Work barely meets what is required at degree level.
Fail No evidence of basic a minimum grasp of the subject and the minimum relevant research techniques. No evidence of background reading and no familiarity with any relevant examples and case studies. Inadequate evidence of coherent logical thought; ineffective presentation skills with poor argumentation and no abilities to draw meaningful conclusions. Work fails to reach degree level.
Course Type Lecture with laboratory component course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Field work 12
Laboratory 24
Lectures 26
Project work 12
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments 30 CLO 2,4
Examination 50 CLO 1,2,4
Laboratory reports 20 CLO 1,3
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
R. S. K. Barnes, Peter P. Calow, P. J. W. Olive, D. W. Golding, J. I. Spicer. 2001
The Invertebrates: A Synthesis, 3rd Edition, Wiley-Blackwell.
Ruppert, Edward E.; Fox, Richard S.; Barnes, Robert D. Invertebrate Zoology: A Functional Evolutionary Approach. 2004. Belmont, CA: Thomas-Brooks/Cole.
Students will be directed to relevant scientific literature and websites
Course Website http://www.biosch.hku.hk/ecology/lsc/
Additional Course Information Offer in alternate year from 2017-2018
This course will be offered subject to a minimum enrollment number and availability of teachers


BIOL3328 Nearshore marine and estuarine ecology (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 10
Course Co-ordinator Prof. G.A. Williams, Biological Sciences < hrsbwga@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Prof. G.A. Williams,School of Biological sciences)
Course Objectives Using a comparative approach between Hong Kong and South African shores, students will learn to identify the relevant environmental gradients which define the intertidal zone, and the species interactions which mould these communities.  
This will be achieved through an intensive field-based approach, visiting and working in different intertidal habitats in both Hong Kong and, during a residential fieldcamp, in South Africa.
Course Contents & Topics Students will learn the abiotic and biotic factors that structure intertidal communities in Hong Kong and, during a residential fieldcamp, different South African intertidal communities.  In South Africa, specific topics will focus on
(1) Intertidal biodiversity and species interactions
(2) Species distribution patterns on intertidal shores
(3) Species interactions and behaviour
(4) Trophic interactions and connectivity between local terrestrial and marine communities.
(5) Larger-scale connectivity from freshwaters to marine systems
HKU Students will work in groups with students from the University of Johannesburg and North West University, South Africa to collect data; design and carry out experiments; present their findings; and write up formal scientific reports on the different topics.
Note individual topics may change in different years and are weather dependent.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 compare the contrast the shallow water coastal environments of Hong Kong and the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa
CLO 2 identify a range of species and their roles and relationships in the intertidal zone
CLO 3 understand the abiotic conditions defining the intertidal environment and quantify and interpret the distribution of species over relevant environmental gradients
CLO 4 design, execute and analyse experiments to investigate species interactions
CLO 5 integrate abiotic and biotic interactions to determine patterns of connectivity between intertidal habitats
CLO 6 analyse, interpret and present data using a variety of media to demonstrate scientific understanding of topics
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOL2306 or BIOL3301
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Marine Biology ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,3,4,5,6,7 >
2018 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity (Intensive) < PLO 1,2,3,4,5,6 >
2017 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,3,4,5,6,7 >
2016 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,3,4,5,6,7 >
2015 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,3,4,5,6,7 >
2014 Major in Ecology & Biodiversity < PLO 1,3,4,5,6,7 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        2nd sem    Examination No Exam     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Thorough and complete grasp of the subject. Strong analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, with evidence of original thought. Excellent lab / fieldwork skills and techniques. Critical use of data and results to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions. Excellent organizational and presentational skills
B Good and near-complete grasp of the subject. Evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking. Competent lab / fieldwork skills and techniques. Correct use of data of results to draw appropriate conclusions. Good organizational and presentational skills.
C Adequate (but incomplete) grasp of the subject. Evidence of some analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking. Adequate lab / fieldwork skills and techniques. Mostly correct but some erroneous use of data and results to draw appropriate conclusions. Fair organizational and presentational skills.
D Limited grasp, with retention of some relevant information, of the subject. Evidence of some coherent and logical thinking, but with limited analytical and critical abilities. Barely adequate lab / fieldwork skills and techniques. Limited ability to use data and results to draw appropriate conclusions. Barely satisfactory organizational and presentational skills.
Fail Poor or inadequate knowledge and understanding of the subject. Lack of analytical and critical abilities, logical and coherent thinking. Inadequate lab / fieldwork skills and techniques. Misuse of data and results and/or unable to draw appropriate conclusions. Incoherent organization and poor presentational skills.
Course Type Field camps
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Field work 60
Lectures Pre-course modules 8
Tutorials Pre-course assignments 10
Reading / Self study 50
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments Group presentation 20 CLO 3,4,5,6
Report 70 CLO 1,2,3,4,5,6
Test Pre-course 10 CLO 1,2,6
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Students will be directed to relevant scientific literature, websites and appropriate teaching materials.
Course Website http://www.biosch.hku.hk/ecology/lsc/
Additional Course Information Students who have taken BIOL3318 will be at an advantage.
Students will join undergraduate students from the University of Johannesburg and North Western University, South Africa on a residential field camp at Tsitsikamma (Storms River Camp, Eastern Province, South Africa) in the second Reading Week (Second Semester).  Students will be expected to live in tented accommodation and contribute to daily camp activities as well as conduct fieldwork in potentially harsh environmental conditions.  Extra costs may be involved in the course, which may include airfares.  Accommodation, meal costs and internal travel in South Africa are covered by South African hosts.


BIOL3401 Molecular biology (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 130
Course Co-ordinator Dr K W Y Yuen, Biological Sciences < kwyyuen@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr C B Chan,Biological Sciences)
(Dr K W Y Yuen,Biological Sciences)
(Prof B K C Chow,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives To provide students with recent knowledge in molecular biology with special emphasis on the study of gene structure and function at the molecular level.
Course Contents & Topics The course includes a detailed account of the molecular processes in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, from DNA replication, RNA transcription, protein translation, to post-translational modifications with special emphasis on the regulation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic gene expression. Recently developed biochemical techniques including oligonucleotide synthesis, DNA sequencing, complementary screening and DNA cloning, site-directed mutagenesis, polymerase chain reaction and transgenic technology will also be discussed.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 know the basic structures of DNA, RNA and protein, and how DNA is package in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells
CLO 2 understand the biochemical processes involved in DNA replication, transcription, translation and post-translational modifications in prokaryotes and eukaryotes
CLO 3 explain and describe the regulation of gene transcription in prokaryotes and eukaryotes
CLO 4 demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the underlying concepts associated with recently developed techniques including PCR, site-directed mutagenesis, DNA sequencing
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOC2600 or BIOL2103 or BIOL2220 or MEDE2301
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology (Intensive) ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Major in Biochemistry ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2018 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2,3 >
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology (Intensive) < PLO 1,2,3 >
2017 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2017 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2017 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2,3 >
2016 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2016 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2016 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2,3 >
2015 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2015 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2015 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2,3 >
2014 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2014 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2014 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2,3 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        1st sem    Examination Dec     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough mastery at an advanced level of extensive knowledge required for attaining all the course learning outcomes. Show strong analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, with evidence of original thought, and ability to apply knowledge to a wide range of complex, familiar and unfamiliar situations. Apply highly effective lab skills and techniques. Critical use of data and results to draw appropriate and insightful conclusions. Apply highly effective organizational and presentational skills.
B Demonstrate substantial command of a broad range of knowledge required for attaining at least most of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, and ability to apply knowledge to familiar and some unfamiliar situations. Apply effective lab skills and techniques. Correct use of data of results to draw appropriate conclusions. Apply effective organizational and presentational skills.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete command of knowledge required for attaining most of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of some analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, and ability to apply knowledge to most familiar situations. Apply moderately effective lab skills and techniques. Mostly correct but some erroneous use of data and results to draw appropriate conclusions. Apply moderately effective organizational and presentational skills.
D Demonstrate partial but limited command of knowledge required for attaining some of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of some coherent and logical thinking, but with limited analytical and critical abilities. Show limited ability to apply knowledge to solve problems. Apply partially effective lab skills and techniques. Limited ability to use data and results to draw appropriate conclusions. Apply limited or barely effective organizational and presentational skills.
Fail Demonstrate little or no evidence of command of knowledge required for attaining the course learning outcomes. Lack of analytical and critical abilities, logical and coherent thinking. Show very little or no ability to apply knowledge to solve problems. Apply minimally effective or ineffective lab skills and techniques. Misuse of data and results and/or unable to draw appropriate conclusions. Organization and presentational skills are minimally effective or ineffective.
Course Type Lecture with laboratory component course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Laboratory 20
Lectures 24
Tutorials 6
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments assessment of practical work 20 CLO 1,2,4
Examination 80 CLO 1,2,3,4
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
R. Weaver:  Molecular Biology (McGraw-Hill, 2005 or 2008)
J. Watson et al.: Molecular Biology of the Gene (Benjamin Cummings, 2004)
B. Lewin: Gene IX (Jones and Bertlett, 2008)
Selected journal articles and web learning materials.
TBC
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk/
Additional Course Information


BIOL3402 Cell biology and cell technology (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 120
Course Co-ordinator Prof A S T Wong, Biological Sciences < awong1@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr J S H Tsang,Biological Sciences)
(Dr W Y Lui,Biological Sciences)
(Prof A S T Wong,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives To provide a coherent understanding of the structure and function of cells, and the principles and applications of cell culture and instrumentation in biology and biotechnology
Course Contents & Topics I. Cell Biology
Cell membranes. Organelles. Cellular transport: ions transport and ions channels. Protein and RNA transport. Membrane potentials, Action potentials. Cell junctions. Extracellular Matrix. Cell-cell interactions. Cell-matrix interactions.

II. Techniques in animal cell culture
Mammalian cells in culture. Primary and continuous cell lines. Cell types and cell growth parameters. Media formulation, growth factors and design of serum-free media. Culture lab facilities and sterilization. Mechanism of cryopreservation.

III. Techniques in plant cell culture
Root and shoot cultures. Explant regeneration. Protoplasts. Secondary metabolites.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 acquire fundamental knowledge on cell biology and cell technology
CLO 2 demonstrate basic laboratory techniques on cell culture
CLO 3 gain insight into real-life applications in cell biology and cell technology
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOC2600 or BIOL2103 or BIOL2220 or MEDE2301
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology (Intensive) ( Core/Compulsory )
2018 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2017 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2016 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2015 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Core/Compulsory )
2014 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2018 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2,3 >
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology (Intensive) < PLO 1,2,3 >
2017 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2017 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2017 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2,3 >
2016 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2016 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2016 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2,3 >
2015 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2015 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2015 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2,3 >
2014 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2014 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3 >
2014 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2,3 >
Offer in 2018 - 2019 Y        1st sem    Examination Dec     
Offer in 2019 - 2020 Y
Course Grade A+ to F
Grade Descriptors
A Demonstrate thorough mastery at an advanced level of extensive knowledge required for attaining all the course learning outcomes. Show strong analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, with evidence of original thought, and ability to apply knowledge to a wide range of complex, familiar and unfamiliar situations. Apply highly effective organizational skills. Writings consistently demonstrate informed, thoughtful intellectual engagement with broad range of relevant concepts.
B Demonstrate substantial command of a broad range of knowledge required for attaining at least most of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, and ability to apply knowledge to familiar and some unfamiliar situations. Apply effective organizational skills. Writings mostly demonstrate informed, thoughtful intellectual engagement with broad range of relevant concepts.
C Demonstrate general but incomplete command of knowledge required for attaining most of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of some analytical and critical abilities and logical thinking, and ability to apply knowledge to most familiar situations. Apply moderately effective organizational skills. Writings mostly indicate informed, intellectual engagement with concepts or theories but not always with sufficient depth, breadth or understanding.
D Demonstrate partial but limited command of knowledge required for attaining some of the course learning outcomes. Show evidence of some coherent and logical thinking, but with limited analytical and critical abilities. Show limited ability to apply knowledge to solve problems. Apply limited or barely effective organizational skills. Writings indicate some intellectual engagement with concepts or theories but mostly at a superficial level.
Fail Demonstrate little or no evidence of command of knowledge required for attaining the course learning outcomes. Lack of analytical and critical abilities, logical and coherent thinking. Show very little or no ability to apply knowledge to solve problems. Organizational skills are minimally effective or ineffective. Writings reveal an absence of intellectual engagement with concepts or theories. Writings are irrelevant or superficial.
Course Type Lecture with laboratory component course
Course Teaching
& Learning Activities
Activities Details No. of Hours
Laboratory 24
Lectures 24
Tutorials 12
Reading / Self study 100
Assessment Methods
and Weighting
Methods Details Weighting in final
course grade (%)
Assessment Methods
to CLO Mapping
Assignments assessment of practical work 30 CLO 1,2,3
Examination 70 CLO 1,3
Required/recommended reading
and online materials
Textbooks:
Alberts, B. et al.: Molecular Biology of the Cell (Garland, 2014, 6th ed.)
Mather, J. P.: Introduction to Cell and Tissue Culture, Theory and Techniques (Plenum, 1998)
Collins, H.A. & Edwards, G.S.: Plant Cell Culture (Oxford: Bios Scientific, 1998)

References:
TBC
Course Website http://moodle.hku.hk/
Additional Course Information


BIOL3403 Immunology (6 credits) Academic Year 2018
Offering Department Biological Sciences Quota 100
Course Co-ordinator Dr W B L Lim, Biological Sciences < bllim@hku.hk >
Teachers Involved (Dr Chaogu Zheng,Biological Sciences)
(Dr W B L Lim,Biological Sciences)
Course Objectives To provide a broad understanding of the animal immune system.  Topics will also include the application of a variety of immunological methods to research and disease diagnosis.
Course Contents & Topics Immunological functions in the vertebrates and analogous activities in invertebrates.  Structures and biological properties of immunoglobulins and T-cell receptors.  Divergence of antibody genes.  Emergence and characteristic of lymphoid tissues.  Major histocompatibility complex.  Complement pathways.  Immunity against bacteria, viruses and parasites.  AIDS, Vaccination, hypersensitivity, and autoimmunity.  Immunological tests and immunochemical techniques using non mammalian and mammalian antibodies and their application to various biological problems.
Course Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

CLO 1 describe the structure and function of the immune molecules which are involved in the body defense mechanisms, including antibody, T-cell receptor, cytokines, MHC and complement proteins
CLO 2 describe the organization of the mammalian immune system in terms of genes, cells and tissues
CLO 3 explain the underlying mechanisms associated with transplant rejection, transfusion reaction and vaccination
CLO 4 explain how the immune system responds to infections by bacteria, viruses and parasites
CLO 5 understand antigen-antibody interaction and the principle of immunoassays
Pre-requisites
(and Co-requisites and
Impermissible combinations)
Pass in BIOC2600 or BIOL2103 or BIOL2220 or MEDE2301
Course Status with Related Major/Minor /Professional Core 2018 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology (Intensive) ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2018 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2017 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2016 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2015 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Biological Sciences ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Biochemistry ( Disciplinary Elective )
2014 Minor in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology ( Disciplinary Elective )
Course to PLO Mapping 2018 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2018 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2,3 >
2018 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology (Intensive) < PLO 1,2,3 >
2017 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2017 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >
2017 Major in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology < PLO 1,2,3 >
2016 Major in Biochemistry < PLO 1,2,3,4,5 >
2016 Major in Biological Sciences < PLO 1,2,3,4 >